41 days ago

We Say/You Say: Bank Closures

Thomas Campbell Reporter from The Bay Chronicle

Hi neighbours,

How are you going to be impacted by changes in banking?

Mayors around the country have called on the government to intervene in bank closures around the country.

33 mayors around the country have signed an open letter to Jacinda Ardern asking her government to investigate the closures. The mayors stated that access to ATMs would not address the social harm and depravities for provincial and farming communities.

Last week, Kiwibank announced that it would close seven of its branches, with BNZ confirming it would close 38 branches nationwide.

BNZ Chief Customer Officer, Paul Carter, said three-quarters of their customers are digitally active.
“The majority of our customers are banking online and our talented bankers are often waiting in empty branches for customers that simply do not arrive,” he said.

BNZ customer Jasmine Polglase was more concerned for her grandparents, who banked with the BNZ.
“They don’t have a computer, like many elderly. But unlike my grandparents, some here don’t have family to do banking for them and help them navigate that sort of thing.”

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More messages from your neighbours
3 minutes ago

Did you attend the SS Ventnor memorial dedication on Saturday?

Denise Piper Reporter from Northern News

The event was a unique blend of Māori and Chinese cultures, who have come together over the tragic sinking of the SS Ventnor. The ship went down near Hokianga Harbour in 1902 with the loss of 13 lives and the loss of 499 Chinese remains, which were on a voyage back to their home towns in China, as per the custom there. When local Māori found some of the remains washes ashore, they respectfully buried them and tended to the graves. The memorial at Opononi is the start of a new chapter between these two people.

1 day ago

Face to Face Communication versus Technology

Alison Shrigley Reporter from Northern News

FROM A TEACHER: Yesterday, I shut down class about 5 minutes early and told my students I wanted them to just sit and talk to one another. Several of them immediately opened their laptops and began navigating to their favorite computer game.
I said, "No, no laptops. I want you to have face-to-face conversations right now."
After a collective groan went up, I observed something both wonderful and alarming. For the next few minutes, a couple of tables came alive with conversation. They looked at each other in the eyes and talked with great enthusiasm and interest. It was beautiful to watch and listen to.
However, many students were deflated. They did not know what to do without some sort of entertainment from a device. A couple of them put their heads down and avoided eye contact with anyone. I went around the room to those students and tried to engage with them. Some of them mustered a few words, but most didn't know what to do.
I share this story as a wakeup call for parents, grandparents, and guardians. It's tragic to me that a large percentage of today's youth do not know how to have real conversation, but it's not their fault. It is our responsibility as adults to lead by example and hold our kids accountable. Unplug every day, talk, and listen to your children. Getting lost in a device does not help them cope with and overcome the things they're going through mentally, emotionally, and spiritually. All it causes is isolation and depression. They need relationships; they need you.
I plan on doing it again today. #PleaseShare

This was written and supplied by Margaret Johnson in Kaikohe

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4 hours ago

We Say/You Say: Kiwi Sanctuary

Thomas Campbell Reporter from The Bay Chronicle

Hi neighbours,

Would you support a predator-free, fenced area in an area near you?

Five kiwi have been found dead in Northland and a dog is believed to be responsible.

The Department of Conservation is urging dog owners to keep control of their pets especially during the daytime where kiwi are at their most vulnerable.

From 1990 to 2018, 345 kiwi were killed by dogs in the North Island, according to DOC. With heightened conservation efforts, the Northland kiwi population is showing positive signs of recovery.

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