55 days ago

Don't try this at home: Why Lemons Aren't a Magic Potion for Flawless Skin

Tsahallah from Beauty Fields

The charm of natural remedies is undeniable, especially when it comes to skincare. From honey masks to coffee scrubs, DIY concoctions flood social media, promising quick fixes for everything from wrinkles to hyperpigmentation. But before you squeeze that lemon onto your face based on the latest TikTok "hack," hold on! As a pharmacist who has dedicated years to formulating gentle yet effective skincare, I'm here to burst the citrus bubble and explain why lemons are a bad idea for treating skin spots.

Lemon on your face is not such a good idea.
The Acidic Truth, what you don’t know can harm you

Let's start with the science. Lemons are undeniably rich in vitamin C, an antioxidant praised for its brightening properties. However, the key ingredient responsible for that "magic" is citric acid, a potent alpha hydroxy acid (AHA). While AHAs can indeed exfoliate dead skin cells, revealing a seemingly brighter complexion, the harsh reality is that lemon juice is far too acidic for your delicate facial skin.
Imagine this: your skin's natural pH sits around a healthy 5.5, slightly acidic but leaning towards neutral. Lemon juice, on the other hand, boasts a pH of 2-3, making it incredibly acidic and comparable to vinegar! Applying this directly to your face disrupts your skin's natural barrier, potentially leading to:
Inflammation and irritation: Redness, burning, and stinging are common reactions, especially for sensitive skin.
Increased sun sensitivity: AHAs make your skin more susceptible to sun damage, potentially worsening hyperpigmentation instead of lightening it.
Uneven skin tone: Over-exfoliation, inflammation, and increased sun sensitivity can lead to patchy, uneven skin tone, the opposite of the desired effect. Yup! It can make things worse!


pH2 is 1000 times more acidic than pH5, it’s a logarithmic scale
Beyond the Burn: The Long-Term Damage
The harm doesn't stop at immediate reactions. Frequent use of lemon juice can weaken your skin's barrier, making it more vulnerable to environmental damage, infections, and premature aging. It's essentially trading short-term perceived brightness for long-term skin woes.
The Temptation of the Algorithm: Why We Fall for the "Hacks"
So, why do these questionable practices gain traction online? The answer lies in a complex mix of factors:
Appeal to natural remedies: The belief that "natural" equals safe and effective is very strong.
Influencer trust: We often see flawless, filtered complexions on our screens, leading us to believe the methods used are foolproof, regardless of their potential harm.
Cherry-picking results: Social media thrives on showcasing successes, rarely highlighting negative experiences or potential dangers.
The Power of Informed Choices: Seek Expertise, Not Likes
It's important to remember that quick fixes rarely deliver lasting results, and especially when it comes to your skin, caution is paramount. Be weary before trying any DIY trend, especially on your face!
Remember, your skin is your largest organ, deserving of care and respect. Don't fall victim to online trends that prioritize likes over lasting results. Choose the informed path, treat your skin with gentleness and respect, and use lemons for lemonade - the healthy way, not on your face.

Use your Lemons wisely, drink them!

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Are you a first home buyer?

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Hello!
Are you a first home buyer? Is your mortgage going up and up with rising interest rates and you’re now struggling to make ends meet? Have you lost the ability to save any extra cash?

We’re reaching out from the Tova show, the flagship weekly politics podcast on Stuff, as we prepare a special episode on the interest rate crunch and how it’s affecting Kiwis - we’d love to hear your stories.

Please comment below if you would like to share your story, or email tova@stuff.co.nz. We give you our commitment to treat your experience with sensitivity and care.

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