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  • Cleaning & Mould Removal

    We are industry specialists in removing mould and mildew from curtains, drapes & blinds.

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    Repairs, alterations and replacement parts for most window treatments

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3 days ago

Are Curtains or Blinds best for kids’ bedrooms?

Owner from Curtain Clean BOP Ltd

Choosing curtains and/or blinds for a child’s bedroom is much more complicated than you might think, with several factors to take into consideration when making the right choice. Let’s go over what you need to think about.

Blocking out light
Any parent will tell you kids need darkness to go… View more
Choosing curtains and/or blinds for a child’s bedroom is much more complicated than you might think, with several factors to take into consideration when making the right choice. Let’s go over what you need to think about.

Blocking out light
Any parent will tell you kids need darkness to go to bed. They don’t necessarily need darkness to sleep, but to convince them it’s bedtime it needs to be dark. Post daylight savings, heading into spring and summer, this can be a challenge. Curtains and blinds can help.

First of all, opt for block-out lining. Block-out lined curtains reduce natural light and UV rays, providing an ideal solution for darkening a bedroom. They also offer thermal and sound insulation properties, which come in handy too and we’ll discuss more shortly.

The best solution to block out light is curtains made of medium to heavy fabric, hanging wide and high over the window and down to the floor. But don’t make a decision yet, there are things to consider that might make you shy away from this option.

Slatted blinds are the least ideal solution as they allow small amounts of light to peep through even when fully closed and lowered. An inside mounted roller blind also allows a small amount of light to enter. For extra light blockage consider a curtain over a blind.

Reducing noise
Blocking out noise completely using only curtains or blinds is not possible, but it can be reduced. The best options are:
• Curtains – reducing noise all comes down to absorbing the vibrations so opt for the thickest, heaviest fabric you can (e.g. velvet or wool). The more layers the better so ensure you get them lined and you could also opt for a blind underneath as well.
• Roman shades – as with curtains, the thicker the fabric and more layers the better.
• Honeycomb blinds - the unique cellular design is great for cutting out noise. Just as the cells trap air to reduce heat transfer, they can also help keep out noise.

How they look
Consider the age and gender your child is now but also consider how long you want the curtains to last and how old your child will be then. What is right for a child aged 2 will be totally wrong come age 6.

Kids tend to enjoy bright colours and bold patterns, or they might want a fabric featuring a favourite character from a book, TV show or movie. Be aware the latter option is likely to date quickly and the above point applies here too; while they may love superheroes right now, will they still be as cool in 12 months’ time?

If kids are sharing a room maybe consider something a bit more neutral that will appeal to both.
And as they get older, into their teens for example, they will become even more opinionated about their “style” and what they like will have evolved and expanded a lot since they were young kids.

Privacy
If your child’s room is exposed and can be seen by neighbours or from the street, consider hanging sheers to ensure their privacy is maintained.

Health & safety
Beware of blind cords ad these are a strangulation hazard. Either make sure they are tightly wound around a cleat and out of reach, choose electronically operated blinds or spring-loaded roller blinds, or get blinds with a tension cord and pulley so there is no loose cord dangling.
Blinds or lightweight curtains are better for kids who suffer allergies. Thicker fabrics are better at collecting dust, pollen, and dust mites.

Shorter curtains are recommended over floor length for younger children so they can’t grab hold and pull or wrap themselves up in them.

Don’t use tension rods. These are operated by spring-loaded tension and therefore not screwed into the wall. One good tug and the lot could come tumbling down.


Don’t forget – regular cleaning will keep your childs room healthy. We can help with that!


www.curtainclean.co.nz...

3 days ago

Jumping for Jute!

Owner from Curtain Clean BOP Ltd

Jute is a natural fibre with golden & silky shine, and hence nicknamed as The Golden Fibre.

Jute is one of the most versatile natural fibres that has been used in raw materials for packaging, textiles, non-textile, and agricultural sectors.

Jute is a vegetable plant whose fibres are dried… View more
Jute is a natural fibre with golden & silky shine, and hence nicknamed as The Golden Fibre.

Jute is one of the most versatile natural fibres that has been used in raw materials for packaging, textiles, non-textile, and agricultural sectors.

Jute is a vegetable plant whose fibres are dried in long strips, and it’s one of the cheapest natural materials available; together with cotton, it is one of the most frequently used.

The plants from which jute is obtained grow mainly in warm and humid regions, such as Bangladesh, China, and India.

Jute can be grown year-round and is harvested every six months. It can take decades to produce the same volume of wood fiber and it requires much larger tracts of land to cultivate.

The woody core of the jute plant, called hurd, has thousands of potential industrial and commercial uses. As an alternative to wood, hurd is capable of meeting most of the world’s demand for wood and wood products. Using hurd and jute fibres means that the level of deforestation to meet the current demand for paper and wood could be significantly decreased if they were used as an alternative.

Jute is 100% biodegradable (it degrades biologically in 1 to 2 years), low-energy recyclable, and can even be used as compost for the garden. It is clear in terms of reusability and recyclability that jute bags are one of the best options available nowadays.

Jute fibres are tougher and more resilient than paper made from wood pulp and can withstand prolonged exposure to water and weather. They can be reused many times and are thus very environmentally friendly.

The application of jute is a significant step in combating the use of different materials containing toxic wastes. Jute bags cut down the employment of plastic bags, which have now been effectively banned in many countries due to their harmful components. Jute seems to be one of the best alternatives to it.

We hope you enjoyed learning about Jute as much as we did, we would love to hear your comments!

12 days ago

Mould removal - Roman blinds

Owner from Curtain Clean BOP Ltd

Check out the result from these Roman Blinds. Looking good as new thanks to our cleaning team.
We've been doing this a LONG time - we're mould removal experts. Bring your mouldy curtains or blinds in for a clean up! No extra charges for mould treatment, included in cleaning cost.

15 days ago

How to Stop Your Pet from Destroying Your Blinds

Owner from Curtain Clean BOP Ltd

From a dog’s point of view, blinds are just an obstacle keeping them from the window. When there’s a something outside, the blinds just become a casualty of the resulting frenzy to get out there. Keep blinds raised part-way to allow your pup to see out and avoid wreckage. Avoid this issue by … View moreFrom a dog’s point of view, blinds are just an obstacle keeping them from the window. When there’s a something outside, the blinds just become a casualty of the resulting frenzy to get out there. Keep blinds raised part-way to allow your pup to see out and avoid wreckage. Avoid this issue by teaching your dog to stay calm in exciting situations.

Many dogs, especially as puppies, will chew on anything in sight. If your blinds have become your pets teething stick, it’s because he doesn’t have anything else to chew on. Deter dogs from gnawing on blinds by spraying slats with sour apple spray (available at pet stores). It smells and tastes terrible to dogs but is neutral to humans.

When you’re away from home, keep your dog in a safe room and give them special toys that are otherwise hidden away. Treat-filled toys and meat flavoured bones are especially appealing. With these toys to keep them preoccupied, they won’t think twice about the blinds.

Dogs can be like children; they have a lot of energy and it will find a way out whether you provide it or not. With this in mind, give your dog an opportunity to tire themselves out and your home might not become a race track.

What are the pet-friendliest window dressings?
Try vertical blinds. Furry friends can nudge slats out of the way to see out the window and they’ll fall back into place afterwards. If pets chew on blind slats, you can order individual replacements instead of getting a whole new set. If pet hair and grime are a problem, just wipe them clean with soap and water.

Venetian blinds have wide enough openings between slats for curious pets who just want to see out. But if you have a dog with a chewing problem, slats can be vulnerable to damage.

Roller shades are good window treatments for peeking pets. Animals can easily slip behind without damaging the shade and they’re easy to clean.

Try to avoid:
- Venetian Blinds - Bent slats. Enough said.
- Mini Venetian Blinds - Pets won’t be able to see through and will paw at slats.
- Puddled Drapes - When drapes drag on the floor it’s hard to keep them clean and free from pet hair

My dog broke my blinds, my curtains are ripped. Now what?
Don’t worry - paying full price for a replacement blind isn’t your only option. Curtain Clean not only specialises in cleaning your window treatments, but we can repair damage done by your beloved pet pals.


From replacing broken head tape to re-oiling wooden venetians, Curtain Clean are industry experts in restoring curtains and blinds for a fraction of the replacement cost. Bring your window dressings in for clean & repair today.


www.curtainclean.co.nz...

18 days ago

Tips for a Fresher Looking Natural Fibre Rug

Owner from Curtain Clean BOP Ltd

In recent years, more and more people choose to bring natural fibre rugs into their homes due to their cosy warmth, excellent durability, and their eco-friendly manufacturing process. But you probably know all of this already since you bought one yourself. We’ve put together some helpful tips to … View moreIn recent years, more and more people choose to bring natural fibre rugs into their homes due to their cosy warmth, excellent durability, and their eco-friendly manufacturing process. But you probably know all of this already since you bought one yourself. We’ve put together some helpful tips to keep your rug looking fresh.


1) Clean your rug on a regular basis. This may seem like an obvious thing to state, but you should know that it is much easier for dirt particles to become entangled in natural fibre carpeting than it is with their synthetic counterparts. To this end, make sure to regularly vacuum your rug using the appropriate upholstery attachment. Other methods you can try is shaking the rug to remove debris, or hanging it up outside and dusting it with a tennis racket, big stick, etc.


2) Use a damp towel to remedy curled rug corners. If you have been using your natural carpeting as an area rug, especially in high traffic areas, you will sooner or later notice that its corners have started to curl. To fix this, simply dampen the curled area with an evenly spread damp towel, place some weights on top, and leave it overnight. Keep in mind that you may have to repeat this process a few more times, depending on how long your rug had its corners curled.


3) Cut sprouting fibres using shears. Since most natural fibre rugs are braided and sewn by hand, they are very prone to sprouting. This goes double for jute, which has shorter fibres. To remedy this, simply use shears to clip down the fibres that have already stuck out from the rug surface. The good news is that, with time, the fibres will “settle in” and you will no longer have to use your scissors as much.


4) Always contact a manufacturer for advice on cleaning specific stains. If you cannot identify the stain on your rug, or it needs a more thorough cleaning overall, we highly encourage you to seek out the original manufacturer for specific cleaning recommendations, since most companies treat the fibres of their natural products differently.


5) Maintain consistent humidity within your premises. Sisal and other natural fibre rugs should be kept outside of areas with high humidity, since the extra moisture could stain them or even cause them to shrink. Consider purchasing a dehumidifier to maintain optimal humidity in the area where your rug is located.


6) Make sure your rug receives even amounts of sunlight. As mentioned above, sisal and other natural fibres become bleached when exposed to sunlight. So, if your room lets moderate to high amounts of sunlight in, ensure that your rug is either fully exposed to the sunrays or completely hidden in the shadows to maintain a consistent colour. If your rug is half in the sun, rotate it every other week to keep the sun-fade even.


7) Apply a fabric protectant spray. This step is only necessary if your carpet is located in a busy area of the house. Treating the fibres with fabric protectant spray (Scotchgard is pretty cheap at Mitre 10) will ensure that they are well protected against water spills and dirt. Just don’t forget to re-apply the spray regularly as its effect will wear off with time.

We hope you have found something you didn’t know before, please feel free to share with us any tips you have in the comments ?

27 days ago

Coco Coir Fibre

Owner from Curtain Clean BOP Ltd

The thickest and most resistant of all commercial natural fibres, coir is a coarse, short fibre extracted from the outer shell of coconuts.


Coconut coir or, “Coco coir”, is a very versatile resource that is harvested from a fibrous layer underneath the exterior shell of the coconut. Since… View more
The thickest and most resistant of all commercial natural fibres, coir is a coarse, short fibre extracted from the outer shell of coconuts.


Coconut coir or, “Coco coir”, is a very versatile resource that is harvested from a fibrous layer underneath the exterior shell of the coconut. Since coconut growers consider it a waste product, its utilization is highly sustainable. You may have heard of coco coir being used in gardening, but there are many applications for it across multiple industries, beyond horticulture. Here are 10 interesting facts about coco coir that you probably didn’t know!

• Coco coir has many uses including in textiles, upholstery, making rope/fishing nets, environmental cleanup and horticulture, floor mats, doormats, brushes and mattresses.
• There is brown coco coir & white coco coir, each with different properties. When coconuts are ripe, they produce brown coir which is used in gardening and horticulture. White coir is harvested from unripe coconuts, and is much finer and lighter, it even floats on water. This makes it ideal for fishing nets, brushes, and finer textiles.
• Coco coir works well as a snail deterrent when used in the garden.
• Coco coir is highly absorbent and can hold up to 10x the water as peat moss. Some use it as a sustainable alternative to peat moss
• People often use coco coir as bedding in terrariums for snakes, lizards, turtles, and spiders.
• When used for gardening, coco coir is usually packed in a compressed brick. You need to soak the brick with water which allows it to expand substantially. You can then use it as a growing medium or potting mix additive.
• Coco coir contains very low levels of nutrients, so you can’t normally use it as the sole growing medium for plants, EXCEPT, you can use it for microgreens due to their extremely short grow cycle. This is because they don’t require soil nutrients. You also use coco coir in hydroponics since you add the nutrients directly into the water.
• You can re-use coco coir several times in gardening as it retains its properties over time.
• Because of its highly absorptive properties, people sometimes use coco coir to help clean up oil spills and other caustic fluids.

• People use coco coir in litter boxes and animal bedding because of its highly absorptive capabilities. It is much more sustainable than traditional clay cat litter pellets, which don’t break down. Coco coir also absorbs much more liquid than hay, straw, or newspaper which people often use as animal bedding.

These are just a few of the many interesting characteristics and applications of coco coir. In the spirit of sustainability, the utilization of coco coir is a sound environmental practice. Spread the word and take a step in a more sustainable direction.

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30 days ago

Buy Once, Buy Well

Owner from Curtain Clean BOP Ltd

Why we have an endless fascination with mid-century modern. There’s just something about mid-century design (MCD) that captures the imagination. The architecture is emblematic, exciting, and nostalgic. It’s close enough in our history to feel familiar, yet far enough away to be inspirational.
View more
Why we have an endless fascination with mid-century modern. There’s just something about mid-century design (MCD) that captures the imagination. The architecture is emblematic, exciting, and nostalgic. It’s close enough in our history to feel familiar, yet far enough away to be inspirational.
We live in such a completely different way, that interiors of the 50s, 60s and 70s are responding to social behaviours and cues that are no longer the norm, so there’s something contradictory yet enthralling. It touched our generation, our parents, and grandparents, near enough to be real in a way that period antiques of the early 20th century and older, seem more relic-like – exciting sure, but less tangible somehow, coming from a world we can’t really imagine.

MCM exists in the post war world, reflecting a vibrant period of social, technological and political change where design was ground-breaking, architecture brave and sculptural. To those who may have felt that mid-century, retro design has been a passing fad, sit back down! Mid-century style continues to inspire and excite showing its face in new architecture and interior design.

As such, the choice to invest in or keep an original piece of mid-century design is a sound one. Not only are you engaging with something the interior world considers usable in perpetuity, you are continuing a legacy of stewardship and conservation of an important part of our design heritage.

In a world where capitalism has spent our lives teaching us to consume and discard, we are now moving rapidly towards an ideal of longevity and sustainability. So, when you make the decision to ‘adopt’ a classic piece of design, you are giving it another chance to invigorate an interior, and careful consideration to its conservation opens up a world of upholstery opportunities.

There are several main fabric types that seem to perpetuate and have the “flavour” or sentiment of mid-century style whilst also being suitable for upholstery. Simple textures allow the shape of a piece to stand out, warm wools will hug the shapes of these designs, while boucle feels completely relevant to this period.

Fortunately, there are a lot of careful and respectful retailers and upholsterers devoted to the maintenance and celebration of these stunning pieces.

Over the next few weeks we will hear from local upholsterers and retailers of MCD furniture who are equally as passionate about the style and their process for restoring these popular pieces of furniture.
With locations in Sydney and Auckland the owners of Tangerine and Teal Sasha and Vanessa were raised in a home surrounded by art and likely learned their appreciation for a cultivated aesthetic. Some of the well-known brands you may find with Vanessa in Auckland include Otto Larsen, Don, Jon Jansen, and Parker and in Sydney with Sacha you are likely to find Fler, Snelling, Featherston, Parker and Wrightbuilt.

What do you love about mid-century furniture and design?
Simple clean lines and great design feature in the majority of MCM furniture pieces, they are timeless in design and look great mixed in with contemporary pieces to give character and nostalgia to your home.

What items are you always looking out for?
We don’t import furniture from overseas and instead focus our search locally for interesting pieces by local New Zealand and Australian designers who are often underrated on the world stage but have great designs. Recently Vanessa restored and sold a lovely sideboard by New Zealand designer Rudi Schwarz and here in Sydney I just sold a rare dining suite by George Korody.

How did you come to select the fabrics for these stunning pieces?
The Mokum Mondrian Noir was selected for the pair of Parker furniture armchairs, originally these 60s chairs were always produced with wool cushion covers so the construction was a good fit. The Mondarian style black and white pattern is synonymous with the era and compliments the simple lines of the chairs.

The Piet Blanc was selected by our clients to reupholster their 70s Tessa armchairs. The luxurious soft texture in the white colour suited the stuffed cushions and brought luxury and style to the chairs in their setting overlooking the ocean in the northern beaches.
Quality and good design will stand for as long as we continue to look after and celebrate it. Classic pieces will transcend movements of the moment and will continue to add quirk and personality to your interior.

It also reminds us that new pieces bought now can be considered an investment, a collectible of the future, something to be treasured and enjoyed. As such, it’s important to consider with new furniture, buying pieces that evoke something in you – don’t think about fashion or trend, this is something you will be using and looking at daily for years to come, so compromise should not be an option! It should be a decision you are EXCITED about making.

Buying from reputable manufacturers, designer/makers and brands who stand by their quality and craftsmanship will ensure longevity – a legacy piece that generations of the future will be able to re-love, refurbish, and be inspired by.

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32 days ago

Abaca: The Queen of Natural Fibres

Owner from Curtain Clean BOP Ltd

Abaca is a natural leaf fibre that comes from a relative of the banana tree family native to the Philippines that grows throughout tropical regions. It is also called Manilla hemp, though it is not related to actual hemp.

Abaca has great economic importance and is harvested for its strong, … View more
Abaca is a natural leaf fibre that comes from a relative of the banana tree family native to the Philippines that grows throughout tropical regions. It is also called Manilla hemp, though it is not related to actual hemp.

Abaca has great economic importance and is harvested for its strong, versatile fibre. Being regarded as the strongest natural fibres in the world, abaca can be put into various modern sophisticated technologies like the automobile industry and as a raw material for other important industries such as textiles, fashion, and the décor/furnishing industry.

Abaca is commonly used by the paper industry for such specialty uses such as tea bags, banknotes, filter papers and in medical filter sheets. While it is currently used mostly in paper products, abaca has a long history in textiles. Abaca fabric has a stiff quality and holds its structure (it is considered a hard fibre and is comparable in texture to sisal and coir). It has a very long fibre length and is one of the strongest fibres - flexible, durable, and highly resistant to saltwater damage. For these reasons it has been used over time for rope and cording. It can also be woven into home and fashion accessories including wall coverings, rugs, tapestries, and bags. It can be used to make handcrafts such as hats, bags, carpets, clothing, and furniture.

Abaca is generally considered to be a sustainable, environmentally friendly fibre that can empower communities. It has been identified by the United Nations as a “Future Fibre”. That said, not many standards and certifications are used for abaca, so transparency and doing your own due diligence around environmental and social impact are very important when sourcing. The Rainforest Alliance currently certifies some abaca farms.

The harvesting and extraction of fibre from abaca is painstaking process which involves many processes. Stripping and drying of fibres is either done manually or mechanically. After extraction, different grades of fibres are obtained which are then accordingly used for different set of industrial activities.

The world's leading abaca producer is the Philippines. While the crop is also cultivated in other Southeast Asian countries, the second largest producing country is Ecuador, where abaca is grown on large estates and production is increasingly mechanized. Almost all abaca produced is exported, mainly to Europe, Japan, and the USA. Exports from the Philippines are increasingly in the form of pulp rather than raw fibre.

Keep reading: www.curtainclean.co.nz...

36 days ago

Textile Testing - Seam Slippage

Owner from Curtain Clean BOP Ltd

Seam Slippage is one of four key topics (others include Abrasion Resistance, Pilling, and Colourfastness) that we are covering to provide some background as to how we test and why.

Test results provide us with critical information about textile’s durability and suitability for certain … View more
Seam Slippage is one of four key topics (others include Abrasion Resistance, Pilling, and Colourfastness) that we are covering to provide some background as to how we test and why.

Test results provide us with critical information about textile’s durability and suitability for certain applications. We externally test all James Dunlop and Mokum textiles in Melbourne at a highly reputable laboratory who are amongst the most conservative and stringent in the world, due to the extremely harsh environmental conditions we face here in Australia and New Zealand.

We have gathered a number of frequently asked questions relating to seam slippage, so we asked our Mokum Studio designers Stephanie Moffitt and Annie Moir to share their expert knowledge.

Seam slippage is another equally important upholstery test, can you explain what seam slippage actually means?
Seam slippage is the separation or pulling apart of yarns in a fabric usually along a sewn seam or join. More often than not, the yarns don’t actually break they just separate and leave an unsightly gap along the fabric join.

What are the most common causes for seam slippage?
Seam slippage may be the result of a poorly constructed textile and /or the use of defective yarns in the fabric. But more commonly it is due to an inadequate standard of upholstery manufacturing i.e. a display of insufficient seam allowance, a deficient number of stitches in the seam or failure to overlock raw edges during the upholstery process – or a combination of all three factors.
Seam slippage usually occurs on joins that are subjected to heavy load and pressure such as seat cushions and arm rests. Certain furniture styles put more stress on fabric seams such as tub chairs and furniture with a fixed back or seat cushions.

Can composition play a part in seam slippage?
Yes, it can, Linen for example is loved for being a smooth lustrous fibre, but this can make it more susceptible to seam slippage with heavy load. For some linen textiles we would recommend discussing the need for reinforcing upholstery seams with your upholstery manufacturer.

The note “reinforce upholstery seams” is sometimes listed on our sampling specifications – what does it actually mean? Should we assume the fabric is inferior quality?
Firstly, no it doesn’t infer inferior quality. If we’ve specified it as being suitable for upholstery then it is fit for purpose, but we recommend additional seam support for that particular textile.
“Reinforce upholstery seams” simply means using an additional safeguard by stitching a tape along the seam to prevent fraying in high load areas, such as the corner back cushions. Overlocking should be used for loose woven fabric and seated cushion seams.

What’s the remedy for seam slippage? Can you fix it once it starts?
It is difficult to repair seam slippage once it starts. In almost all instances of seam slippage, it will require the furniture to be recovered, or re upholstered. It’s important to ascertain the cause of the seam slippage. If the seam slippage can be identified as being a result of inadequate manufacturing, you’ll need to work with the upholsterer to ensure appropriate manufacturing techniques are being used, including reinforcing seams if required. If the seam slippage is clearly related to the fabric, the furniture would need to be recovered, either from a different batch (if it’s an isolated batch issue) or selecting an alternative fabric which is more suitable for that particular frame.

Can you explain how the seam slippage test is performed?

The test measures how resistant a fabric is to yarns opening/ slipping under pressure along a seam line. Two fabric swatches are sewn together with a standardised seam. The swatches are pulled apart with an equal and opposite force. The test is performed in both warp and weft directions. Any seam opening is then measured while the fabric swatches are being pulled apart. According to the Australian standard, a seam opening should be less than 6mm at maximum force. A lower result indicates a smaller opening and thus a better resistance against seam slippage.


Written by: jamesdunloptextiles.com...

39 days ago

Why Wool is Cool

Owner from Curtain Clean BOP Ltd

• The fleece of sheep has been used to make human clothing since the Stone Age.
• Wool flourishes where there is rain and sunshine. These two elements sustain the grassy fields that sheep graze on. Shearers shave off the wool every year before the weather gets too hot. Wool is the ultimate … View more
• The fleece of sheep has been used to make human clothing since the Stone Age.
• Wool flourishes where there is rain and sunshine. These two elements sustain the grassy fields that sheep graze on. Shearers shave off the wool every year before the weather gets too hot. Wool is the ultimate renewable fibre.
• Wool from about 61 sheep extend all the way from the earth to the moon.
• Wool may be made from mixtures of hair from sheep, alpaca, llama, camel, cashmere, mohair, angora, vicuna, yak, guanaco, beaver or otter. No animals are harmed in the harvesting of wool.
• Wool is flame-resistant. It will not melt and stick to your skin like synthetic fibres. Instead, wool will usually smoulder and extinguish itself when the source of the flame has been removed. The fibre of choice for casinos and airlines.
• The fastest recorded time to shear a sheep is 39.31 seconds by Hilton Barrett of Australia.
• Wool is composed of same protein that makes up the outer protective layer of your skin.
• Have you ever wondered why your wool socks withstand foot stench longer than cotton or synthetic socks? Wool is naturally mildew and mould resistant because it is a natural moisture repellent, MEANING LESS STINK. Wool also reduces dust mite activity (they do not like wool!).
• Over its lifetime, a sheep’s fleece will absorb approximately 30Kg of carbon dioxide.
• Renewable, recyclable, and naturally biodegradable; choosing wool minimizes the amount of waste that sits in landfills. Wool biodegrades in weeks to less than 1 year depending on environmental conditions. This is due to its high nitrogen content.
• Wool products can last for 15 to 20 years (or more)
• Wool can absorb indoor contaminants, including formaldehyde, sulphur dioxide and nitrogen dioxide and locks them away in the fibre core. It is naturally soil and stain resistant, attracts less dirt and dust due to anti-static properties and requires less cleaning than synthetic fabrics.
• Wool fibres have a crimped texture so when it’s packed more tightly together lots of tiny pockets of air form. This structure means that it can absorb and release wick away moisture, allowing your skin to breathe so you feel fresh as a daisy.
• Due to its crimped structure, wool is naturally elastic, and so wool garments have the ability to stretch to your shape but can then return to their original state. It is also resistant to tearing and requires less processing to make it useable.
• Wool’s high nitrogen and water content makes it naturally flame resistant. Wool does not ignite easily and will self-extinguish. Should wool burn it does not melt while burning. Wool produces less smoke and toxic fumes during combustion than synthetic fibres, making it a far safer choice.

42 days ago

Key tips for a warmer, drier home – 9/9 – Washing

Owner from Curtain Clean BOP Ltd

Dry your washing outside or in the garage or carport.


Created by New Zealand's Ministry of Health.
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45 days ago

Cat Allergy

Owner from Curtain Clean BOP Ltd

What is cat allergen?
An allergen is a material that is capable of provoking an allergic reaction, such as pollen grains, dust mites or foods. Cat allergen is not cat hair, but a protein present in the dander and saliva of cats. These allergens become airborne as microscopic particles that can … View more
What is cat allergen?
An allergen is a material that is capable of provoking an allergic reaction, such as pollen grains, dust mites or foods. Cat allergen is not cat hair, but a protein present in the dander and saliva of cats. These allergens become airborne as microscopic particles that can produce allergic symptoms when inhaled into the nose or lungs.

Although individual cats may produce more or less allergen, there is no relationship between the pet’s hair length and allergen production, and no such thing as a non-allergenic breed.

Where is cat allergen found?
Cat allergen is present in the largest amounts in homes with cats, but has also been found in homes where cats have never been present, and in offices or public spaces where animals are not allowed. Cat allergen is particularly sticky and is carried on clothing to other locations. It is almost impossible to not be exposed to some level of cat allergen. Of course, levels of exposure will be much higher where cats are present, and these levels are more likely to cause allergic symptoms.

Because cat allergen particles are particularly small (1/10 the size of dust mite allergen), they remain airborne for prolonged periods of time. Cat allergic individuals are more likely to have a rapid onset of symptoms when entering a room with cats, because the allergen will be in the air and can be easily inhaled. Opening windows, using exhaust fans and using high-efficiency air cleaners can decrease airborne allergen levels.

Soft furnishings, such as carpets, sofas, and mattresses, will hold cat allergen even after a cat is removed from the home or banished from the bedroom. It has been shown that it can take as long as 20 weeks for levels of allergen in carpets to decrease to the levels found in a home without a cat, and up to five years for cat allergen levels in mattresses to decrease to such levels. Removal or treatment of the carpet and sofa, and encasing of the mattress, will reduce the continued exposure to these reservoirs of allergen.

Cat allergen is also found on vertical surfaces such as walls. Attempts to decrease cat allergen exposure in a home should include wall cleaning. If the cat is removed to a restricted area of the home, it is important to realise that airflow through the duct system in a hot air heated home could spread the allergen. Efficient vent and furnace filters could help trap the allergens and reduce this spread.

Step 1: Use Allergen Wash. To get all the cat saliva and dander off your clothing and bedding, use a special detergent that removes all allergens. Use the warmest water setting possible for the fabrics to get all of the saliva and dander out.

Step 2: Use a vacuum with a high efficiency air filter. These filters remove more allergens from the carpeting and upholstery than regular vacuums. Vacuum all the floors and furniture thoroughly to get everything out. Wait several hours after the first vacuuming and go over everything again. This allows the dust you stir up the first time to settle, and you get the remnants of that dust on the second vacuuming. Make sure to empty the vacuum or change the bag outside to prevent everything you vacuumed from coming back in.

Step 3: Steam clean. After vacuuming everything completely, go over the whole area with a steam cleaner. The steam cleaner gets more of the allergens out of the carpet than the vacuum, picking up the cat saliva and dander deeper in the fibres.

Step 4: Take it to the cleaners. Take things you can't wash, such as curtains, to the cleaners. Cleaning will remove the cat saliva and dander from the fabrics. Curtain Clean has a special product used to remove cat allergen. You should advise your curtain or dry cleaners of your allergy so they may apply the correct product.

Step 5: Keep the cats off your fabrics. As soon as the cats get close to any of the fabrics, the dander and saliva will return. Studies have demonstrated that washing of cats with water removes much of their surface allergen, and significantly reduces the amount of future cat allergen produced.

46 days ago

Key tips for a warmer, drier home – 8/9 – Mould

Owner from Curtain Clean BOP Ltd

Key tips for a warmer, drier home, Mould, 8 of 9, 2015.

Use bleach or white vinegar to remove mould from ceilings and walls.


Created by New Zealand's Ministry of Health.
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49 days ago

Natural Animal-Based Textile Fibres

Owner from Curtain Clean BOP Ltd

Animal-based fibres are wool, fur, and excretions, such as silk.

Alpaca: Alpaca is a very exclusive fibre, hollow in part of its structure, and it comes naturally in twenty-three different colours. It is extremely lightweight, has great insulation properties and is stronger than sheep’s wool. … View more
Animal-based fibres are wool, fur, and excretions, such as silk.

Alpaca: Alpaca is a very exclusive fibre, hollow in part of its structure, and it comes naturally in twenty-three different colours. It is extremely lightweight, has great insulation properties and is stronger than sheep’s wool. Alpaca is mixed with other natural fibres such as mohair, silk, or wool to make luxurious garments of the highest quality, both in knitted and flat fabrics.
Alpaca fibres of higher quality coming from the shearing of pups and younger specimens are considered smoother, softer, and warmer than cashmere. It is currently being used to manufacture sportswear. The leading brands in sports have been seduced by this fibre due to its insulation qualities in cold weather.

Angora: Angora is a natural animal-based fibre that comes from the Angora rabbit. It is silky, thin, and soft. This “ultra-silky” white hair from the Angora rabbit is a hollow fibre classified as wool. The hair is light, with great water absorption and quick dry.
Extremely light but very warm, angora is used mainly to make woven clothes such as pullovers, vests, sweaters, and fashion accessories for winter season. Flat fabrics with angora are used to manufacture thermal garments. Angora is mixed with wool to create greater density and elasticity in the fabric, especially for the production of suits and blazers. It also used to make high-quality and luxurious garments.

Cashmere: Cashmere comes from the Kashmir goat, a native of the Himalayas.
Cashmere is a very expensive and exclusive fibre. It is extremely soft and has great thermal properties; cashmere is used to manufacture high-quality sweaters and children’s warm clothes. The well-known “pashmina” is a type of cashmere used in shawls and scarves, produced in the Kashmir Valley. More robust cashmere is employed to manufacture high-quality rugs and carpets.

Sheep wool: A limited supply and its exceptional qualities have made wool the most widely used animal-based textile fibre in the fashion and textile industry.
Wool is a fibre with curly appearance, elastic, soft to the touch, which easily absorbs moisture and has an extremely low rate of heat release. These last few characteristics make woollen garments comfortable and warm.
Wool is a fibre of multiple functions and a wide range of diameters that make it perfect for manufacturing clothing items and fashionable accessories. It is mixed with other natural and synthetic fibres to increase strength. Wool is also used in household textile products as well as in industrial developments such as thermal and acoustic insulation.

Mohair: Mohair is the hair of the Angora goat from the Tibet. It is a very shiny, insulating type of wool, softer and stronger than sheep wool. Mohair is white and dyes with exceptional ease. It has excellent absorption capacity and is mainly used to make knitted garments and crochet accessories. Mohair is also utilized in household textiles to make luxurious beddings and upholstery.

Camel hair: Obtained from Bactrian camels with two humps, it is a fine, soft fibre that is used exclusively in luxurious textiles due to its quality and small supply. To manufacture ultra-exclusive items, camel hair is mixed with cashmere and, in other cases, due to its high cost, it is combined with wool to reduce the final price tag of the garment.
This fibre is employed to manufacture a wide variety of clothing items –suits, coats, sweaters, and jackets—and other accessories for winter season such as gloves, hats, and scarves.

Silk: In many people’s eyes, silk is still “the queen of fabrics”.
Silk is a protein filament produced by the silkworm. Feeding on mulberry leaves, the worm produces liquid silk that once solidified forms the filaments to build its cocoon. Then, once the larva is dead, heat is used to soften the hardened filaments and to unroll them. These individual filaments are later intertwined into one single filament to form the silk yarn.
Silk is a lightweight, lustrous, and soft fibre. It is highly resistant to tensile strength with little or no elasticity. Silk is very glossy because of the triangular prism structure of the fibre and this causes garments made of this fabric to refract incoming light into different angles.
Naturally, silk is used in high-quality textile industry to produce exquisite accessories as well as luxurious, haute couture garments. Additionally, it is utilized in a wide range of home décor items.

53 days ago

Unravelling textile testing - Colourfastness

Owner from Curtain Clean BOP Ltd

Unravelling textile testing - Colourfastness
Colourfastness is one of four key topics (others include Abrasion Resistance, Pilling, Seam Slippage) that we are covering to provide some background as to how we test and why.

Test results provide us with critical information about textile’s … View more
Unravelling textile testing - Colourfastness
Colourfastness is one of four key topics (others include Abrasion Resistance, Pilling, Seam Slippage) that we are covering to provide some background as to how we test and why.

Test results provide us with critical information about textile’s durability and suitability for certain applications. We externally test all James Dunlop and Mokum textiles in Melbourne at a highly reputable laboratory who are amongst the most conservative and stringent in the world, due to the extremely harsh environmental conditions we face here in Australia and New Zealand.


We have gathered a number of frequently asked questions relating to colourfastness so we asked our Mokum studio designers Stephanie Moffitt and Annie Moir to share their expert knowledge.

One of the most important textile tests is that of colourfastness.

Simply put, a colourfastness test measures how well a textile will resist or withstand fading. Fading typically means a change in colour which may be a change in hue, depth or brightness of colour. We perform a range of different colourfastness tests when developing a new textile, we test its resistance to fading against UV light, as well as washing / dry cleaning and also rubbing.

Can you briefly outline the colourfastness to washing/ laundering test?
Colourfastness to washing and/or dry cleaning measures a fabrics ability to withstand fading or colour loss from laundering. The test replicates specific cleaning methods then measures any colour loss against a set of five grey scales, creating a result (1 being least colourfast and 5 being most colourfast). In this instance, a result of 4-5 is the result we strive for.

One question pops up a lot, if a product is machine washable can it be spot cleaned?

We would always approach spot cleaning with water or a cleaning product with caution. Most of our washable textiles are rating as delicate or gentle washing which means a delicate setting and we would prefer a delicate washing liquid. Whereas spot clean tends to be more localised and more aggressive. If spot clean is needed always first try a dry white clean cloth, to reduce any colour loss as this often can remove a stain.

Can you briefly outline the colourfastness to rubbing test?

Colourfastness to rubbing, or commonly known as ‘crocking’ measures fabric resistance to colour loss when subjected to rubbing or friction from another fabric. This is particularly relevant for upholstery textiles – you can imagine wearing white pants and sitting on a dark coloured sofa, you’d want to be confident that when you stand up your pants haven’t changed colour.

With this test, a white cloth is used as a standard abradant, and rubbed against the test fabric in both in both dry and wet conditions, with wet being more severe. Any colour transfer onto the white cloth, and colour loss from the test fabric is analysed and measured against a set of 5 grey scales (1 being least colourfast and 5 being most colourfast). The result we receive from the lab helps us to determine the recommended usage for the upholstery fabric.

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