• Products and Services
  • Curtain cleaning

    Curtain clean specializes in cleaning all types of curtains, Roman blinds, Duet blinds and others.

    CLEANING & MOULD REMOVAL

    We are industry specialists in removing mould and mildew from curtains, drapes & blinds.

    Local agent

    Local agent is Chemdry Hawkes Bay Drop them in or give them a call. 2/9 Severn st. Pandora.

    REPAIRS AND ALTERATIONS.

    At Curtain Clean we can repair your curtains, replace the linings and alter the curtains.

    FIRE RETARDING FABRICS

    Many curtain materials are flameable . We can Treat them with flame resistant solution.

    ROMAN BLINDS

    We can do repairs to Roman blinds. We can add new roller rails to your Roman blinds.

    DUET AND VERASOL BLINDS

    We clean and repair duet and verasol blinds, and night and day shades.

    REPLACEMENT LININGS.

    We replace old torn linings and can make you new linings or add an extra lining to your curtain.

    WEBSITE.

    WWW.CURTAINCLEAN.CO.NZ has pricing and all those important details including your local agent.

    BE HAPPY

    Happiness is clean fresh curtains.

  • DOOR TO DOOR Service.
  • We can arrange our courier to pick up your curtains and we can return them to your door. see website

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9 days ago

Jumping for Jute!

Robert Anderson from Curtain Clean at Whakatane ChemDry

Jute is a natural fibre with golden & silky shine, and hence nicknamed as The Golden Fibre.

Jute is one of the most versatile natural fibres that has been used in raw materials for packaging, textiles, non-textile, and agricultural sectors.

Jute is a vegetable plant whose fibres are dried… View more
Jute is a natural fibre with golden & silky shine, and hence nicknamed as The Golden Fibre.

Jute is one of the most versatile natural fibres that has been used in raw materials for packaging, textiles, non-textile, and agricultural sectors.

Jute is a vegetable plant whose fibres are dried in long strips, and it’s one of the cheapest natural materials available; together with cotton, it is one of the most frequently used.

The plants from which jute is obtained grow mainly in warm and humid regions, such as Bangladesh, China, and India.

Jute can be grown year-round and is harvested every six months. It can take decades to produce the same volume of wood fibre and it requires much larger tracts of land to cultivate.

The woody core of the jute plant, called hurd, has thousands of potential industrial and commercial uses. As an alternative to wood, hurd is capable of meeting most of the world’s demand for wood and wood products. Using hurd and jute fibres means that the level of deforestation to meet the current demand for paper and wood could be significantly decreased if they were used as an alternative.

Jute is 100% biodegradable (it degrades biologically in 1 to 2 years), low-energy recyclable, and can even be used as compost for the garden. It is clear in terms of reusability and recyclability that jute bags are one of the best options available nowadays.

Jute fibres are tougher and more resilient than paper made from wood pulp and can withstand prolonged exposure to water and weather. They can be reused many times and are thus very environmentally friendly.

The application of jute is a significant step in combating the use of different materials containing toxic wastes. Jute bags cut down the employment of plastic bags, which have now been effectively banned in many countries due to their harmful components. Jute seems to be one of the best alternatives to it.

We hope you enjoyed learning about Jute as much as we did, we would love to hear your comments! We have more interesting reads on our blog: www.curtainclean.co.nz...

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15 days ago

Why Choose Custom-Made Curtains

Robert Anderson from Curtain Clean at Whakatane ChemDry

If you’re considering installing curtains in your home, one of the first things you’ll need to decide is whether you’d prefer to buy ready-made curtains or have them custom-made especially for your home.

Get exactly what you want - There’s no need to compromise when you choose to have … View more
If you’re considering installing curtains in your home, one of the first things you’ll need to decide is whether you’d prefer to buy ready-made curtains or have them custom-made especially for your home.

Get exactly what you want - There’s no need to compromise when you choose to have your curtains custom-made; you’ll get exactly what you want and it will be the perfect for your space. A good company will send a consultant to meet with you at your home who will bring with them a wide variety of actual fabric samples so you can see how different colours, patterns and textures look in your space.

The right curtains for the right rooms - You’ll get experienced, professional advice about which type of curtains is best for certain rooms and purposes. For instance, if you want curtains for bedrooms where blocking light is the main priority, your consultant will be able to talk you through the different lining options to achieve this.

A perfect fit - Another benefit of having your curtains custom-made is that your window measurements will be taken by someone who really knows what they’re doing.

Excellent quality - There’s no doubt the finished product will be impeccably made with special attention to detail. And there’s peace of mind knowing your curtains are backed by a decent product warranty.

Finance - By choosing a specialist blind manufacturer there may be the possibility of a finance option to help make it affordable.

Professional installation - And the service will be end-to-end with professional installation also often included.

Keep reading: www.curtainclean.co.nz...

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31 days ago

Sagging sofa cushions – what’s the cause?

Robert Anderson from

“When selecting the fabric and style of a new lounge suite it is crucial to consider its future environment”

Picture this:
You purchased a brand-new couch this autumn. It has extra wide cushions on the seat. It’s sleek, it’s chic, it takes up one third of your lounge and most … View more
“When selecting the fabric and style of a new lounge suite it is crucial to consider its future environment”

Picture this:
You purchased a brand-new couch this autumn. It has extra wide cushions on the seat. It’s sleek, it’s chic, it takes up one third of your lounge and most importantly, you can melt into it on a Friday evening after work.

Fast forward to mid-spring. Sure, you passed all those cold winter’s nights watching movies with the family and you have spent more of the lockdown sitting down than you would like to admit, but now that it’s almost time to pop your bubble your brand-new couch is looking a little… dishevelled.

When selecting the fabric and style of a new lounge suite it is crucial to consider its future environment. To prevent your dream couch from becoming saggy and stretched on the seat cushion after prolonged use, or to remedy the situation, we’ve reached out to James Dunlop Textiles’ Auckland-based Upholstery Specialist, Robert Street, to provide insight into the problem and offer some solutions.

Why does the fabric on a newly upholstered sofa appear stretched and out of shape after only a few months of use?

There are several factors that could come into play here, let’s look at them one by one.

Firstly, it is rare for an upholstery fabric with a synthetic component to stretch as synthetic fibres are very stable. Natural fibres are generally stable but can ‘move’ over time depending on the weave. Twill weaves don’t move (think denim jeans) but basket weaves can move a little. Natural fibres such as cotton and linen can absorb the humidity in the air and ‘relax.’

However, all of James Dunlop Textile’s fabrics undergo the seam slippage test, which is performed as part of the fabric’s evaluation and quality testing process, where any possible issues like the weave stretching are highlighted. Any fabrics with seam slippage test failures are identified and resolved before we manufacture a product for our range.

What is Seam Slippage?
Seam slippage is the separation of yarns in a fabric, usually along a sewn seam or join. Generally, the yarns don’t actually break, they just pull apart leaving an unsightly gap along the fabric join.

So what could be the cause?

With this in mind – we can eliminate fabric stretch as the issue here and look at what the likely cause could be.


1. Foam
Good quality foam loses 5-7% of its loft within the first 3 months of use – this may be a contributing factor here. Some furniture manufacturers use a pre-crushed foam (the Gucci of foams) which prevents this loft loss – while being more expensive, it is worth it as you really do get what you pay for in furniture.

2. The Design
There are two main types of couch designs – cushion seat and fixed seat.

Cushion Seat: The sides of a cushion seat pull upwards, and therefore do not need extra fabric as the cushion flexes to allow the fabric cover to release into the compressed foam in the centre, where you sit.


Fixed Seat: A fixed seat requires an allowance of extra fabric in the back of the base cushion. This extra fabric moves forward, compensating for the foam compressing when you sit on the couch. Once you stand, the foam lofts again and if the extra fabric does not move back to the base of the cushion fast enough it will be trapped, causing a ‘puddled’ saggy look.


Keep reading: www.curtainclean.co.nz...

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36 days ago

Why Wool is Cool

Robert Anderson from

• The fleece of sheep has been used to make human clothing since the Stone Age.
• Wool flourishes where there is rain and sunshine. These two elements sustain the grassy fields that sheep graze on. Shearers shave off the wool every year before the weather gets too hot. Wool is the ultimate … View more
• The fleece of sheep has been used to make human clothing since the Stone Age.
• Wool flourishes where there is rain and sunshine. These two elements sustain the grassy fields that sheep graze on. Shearers shave off the wool every year before the weather gets too hot. Wool is the ultimate renewable fibre.
• Wool from about 61 sheep extend all the way from the earth to the moon.
• Wool may be made from mixtures of hair from sheep, alpaca, llama, camel, cashmere, mohair, angora, vicuna, yak, guanaco, beaver or otter. No animals are harmed in the harvesting of wool.
• Wool is flame-resistant. It will not melt and stick to your skin like synthetic fibres. Instead, wool will usually smoulder and extinguish itself when the source of the flame has been removed. The fibre of choice for casinos and airlines.
• The fastest recorded time to shear a sheep is 39.31 seconds by Hilton Barrett of Australia.
• Wool is composed of same protein that makes up the outer protective layer of your skin.
• Have you ever wondered why your wool socks withstand foot stench longer than cotton or synthetic socks? Wool is naturally mildew and mould resistant because it is a natural moisture repellent, MEANING LESS STINK. Wool also reduces dust mite activity (they do not like wool!).

• Over its lifetime, a sheep’s fleece will absorb approximately 30Kg of carbon dioxide.

Keep reading: www.curtainclean.co.nz...

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45 days ago

An Insight into Viscose

Robert Anderson from

Viscose, or Rayon, was the first regenerated fibre to be manufactured for commercial production in the early 1900s.


As a fabric, it is able to emulate the extremely soft handle and subtle sheen of natural fibres, whilst being more cost effective to produce. Therefore, resulting in the … View more
Viscose, or Rayon, was the first regenerated fibre to be manufactured for commercial production in the early 1900s.


As a fabric, it is able to emulate the extremely soft handle and subtle sheen of natural fibres, whilst being more cost effective to produce. Therefore, resulting in the continued popularity of viscose in fashion and soft furnishings.


Although viscose begins as a natural fibre, it is different from products like linen and cotton because it undergoes a manufacturing process. During this process, wood pulp is dissolved in alkali to make the solution called viscose, which is then squeezed through a nozzle or spinneret into an acid bath to create filaments called regenerated cellulose, and finally spun into yarn.


As with all natural fibres, viscose has a unique personality and requires special care. In this article we will discuss the characteristics of this versatile fabric, whether it is the right choice for your next project, and its unexpected enemy – H2O.

Characteristics of Viscose:
• Soft Handle
• Luxurious appearance and subtle natural lustre.
• Viscose yarn absorbs and holds dye well. Especially when piece dyed, a viscose product has the ability to reflect vibrant and bold colour.
• Can be engineered to resemble other natural fibres such as linen cotton and silk, while in most instances, can be more cost effective.
• Absorbent fibre and less durable when wet. We recommend that fabric qualities with a high percentage of viscose yarn are not washed or spot cleaned with water. Due to the absorbent nature of the yarn, spot cleaning can result in watermarks occurring.
• Dry Cleanable. In most cases we recommend a professional dry clean for compositions with a high amount of viscose.
• Low thermal retention. This characteristic mostly applies to the fashion apparel industry. Being a cellulose based fibre, it does not retain heat as well.
• As with all natural fibres, viscose can be susceptible to fading in direct sunlight due to the extreme UV conditions in Australasia. We recommend you are mindful of where natural fibres are situated in the home. In a drapery situation we always recommend a quality lining.
• For interior textiles, a fabric with a component of viscose yarn is extremely versatile and can be used in drapery, upholstery and accessory applications. We don’t typically recommend viscose fabrics to be used for bedding due to the fibre generally being dry clean only.
• A fabric that contains a viscose component can have the same fabric dye processes, finishes and printing applications as other natural fibres.



Keep reading: www.curtainclean.co.nz...

52 days ago

Stain Removal Guide

Robert Anderson from

Some helpful tips to aid in stain removal!

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57 days ago

Curtains in rentals

Robert Anderson from

Curtains are essential for a warm, healthy home. Here's what to know as a renter to get the most out of your curtains.

Whether a green paisley swirl or a modern muted linen, curtains are essential for a healthy home. More important than the material is the way they’re installed.

When … View more
Curtains are essential for a warm, healthy home. Here's what to know as a renter to get the most out of your curtains.

Whether a green paisley swirl or a modern muted linen, curtains are essential for a healthy home. More important than the material is the way they’re installed.

When warm air hits cold glass, two things happen: the warm air escapes and the newly cooled air forms condensation on the window pane.


The best way of dealing with this is by keeping warm air away from the window with curtains and blinds, which creates a pocket of air between the window and the window covering.

Getting the most out of curtains:
• Ideally, they should touch the floor and the track and curtain should be wider than the window frame. The most important part is to cover the whole window and create a seal against the cold air.
• They should fit tightly against the wall or window frame. Sometimes changing the type of track they’re hung on can close a gap between the window and the curtain. For example, rods and rails are often installed a few centimetres out from the window, which means there can be big gaps and no seal created.
• Pelmets can help to decrease heat loss, but won’t stop it completely.
• Curtains with two layers can increase heat retention, but how they’re fitted is most important.
• Net curtains, installed very close to the window and in contact with the window frame, can be effective.
• Blinds need to be installed snugly inside the window frame to be effective. If they sit out from the window, or if there are gaps between the blind and the frame, they’re not going to keep the heat in.
• Remember to open curtains every morning to make the most of the sun’s heat, and close them at sundown to keep that heat in.

Keep reading: www.curtainclean.co.nz...

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59 days ago

Facts About Fabric

Robert Anderson from

• The average lifetime of a piece of clothing is approximately 3 years.
• Flax is the earliest known natural textile fabric seen used in about 5000 BC. Flax is the material used to make linen which is seeing a huge come back today in drapery and upholstery.
• Nike (with subsidiary Converse)… View more
• The average lifetime of a piece of clothing is approximately 3 years.
• Flax is the earliest known natural textile fabric seen used in about 5000 BC. Flax is the material used to make linen which is seeing a huge come back today in drapery and upholstery.
• Nike (with subsidiary Converse) is the largest fashion company in the world, with a market value of $105 billion.
• There is evidence that cotton and wool were used to create natural fabrics in about 3000 BC and evidence of silk use in 2500 BC in China.
• China is the largest maker and exporter of silk in the world and has been for 100’s of years.
• The average person buys 60 percent more items of clothing every year and keeps them for about half as long as 15 years ago, generating a huge amount of waste.
• The earliest evidence of fabric textiles has been found in Turkey, Egypt, and Israel.
• The creation of man-made fibres has only been within the last 100 years. Rayon was the first man-made fibre created in 1910 and it was called ‘artificial silk’. Viscose is the most common form of Rayon.
• More than 70 percent of the world's population uses second-hand clothing. About 50 percent of collected shoes and clothing is used as second-hand products. Meanwhile, 20 percent is used to produce polishing and cleaning cloths for various industrial purposes, and 26 percent is recycled for applications such as fibre for insulation products, upholstery, fibreboard, and mattresses.
• Microfibre or Ultrasuede was invented over 20 years ago in Japan. Microfibre is the thinnest of all man-made fibres, even finer than silk. it is 100 times finer than a human hair.
• Acrylic is a man-made fibre that has a soft, wool-like hand, is machine washable and has excellent colour retention. It is often an additive to textiles to take advantage of these properties.
• Nearly 100 percent of textiles and clothing are recyclable.
• Nylon is also man-made and was first produced in 1938. It has high strength, excellent resilience, and superior abrasion resistance. Nylon replaced silk stockings for women in the early part of the 20th century.
• The highest quality cotton comes from Egypt.
• Textiles and shoes make up 12% of landfill sites.
• Bamboo is a grass that has been used to create a fabric that hangs much like a heavy linen. It has natural wicking ability that pulls moisture away from the skin so it can be useful in reducing moisture related odour. It also has natural anti-bacterial qualities. Bamboo grows quickly and does not need pesticides to thrive, making it one of the more sustainable textile sources.

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64 days ago

Just for laughs!

Robert Anderson from

"I HATE having a messy house. Not enough to actually clean it. But enough to give it a really disgusted stare from my seat on the couch."

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65 days ago

Fire Proofing for business & residential

Robert Anderson from

Fires spread QUCKLY - It takes 3 minutes for a manageable fire to turn into something that is dangerous and fast-moving.


You can help keep fires from spreading quickly by having your curtains and upholsteries treated with a fire-retardant solution. Fire-retarding curtain fabric dramatically … View more
Fires spread QUCKLY - It takes 3 minutes for a manageable fire to turn into something that is dangerous and fast-moving.


You can help keep fires from spreading quickly by having your curtains and upholsteries treated with a fire-retardant solution. Fire-retarding curtain fabric dramatically slows the progress of the flame. We spray on a solution that helps prevent the fire from catching onto the curtains and igniting them, allowing the flame to travel upwards quickly.


The 2016 Building regulations now require curtains in ANY public space (such as a restaurant, school, hall) to have fire retardant curtains.


Our solution is quick to apply, odourless, can be applied on site, good for natural and synthetic materials, and we provide a 5 year Certificate of Compliance for AS 1530 Part 2 (the Australian & NZ standard for flame-retardant fabrics for use in curtains and drapes).
Call us on 0800 579 0501 to find out more.

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67 days ago

Common Types of Fabric Construction for Curtains and Upholstery - Part 1

Robert Anderson from

When it comes to home interiors and soft furnishings there really is a vast range of curtain and upholstery fabrics to choose from, all with varying attributes for certain applications. To ensure you start your project off with the right foundations, you need to be selecting a fabric that is most … View moreWhen it comes to home interiors and soft furnishings there really is a vast range of curtain and upholstery fabrics to choose from, all with varying attributes for certain applications. To ensure you start your project off with the right foundations, you need to be selecting a fabric that is most suited to its purpose.

There are various textile constructions/qualities that fall within five fabric “types” we describe in an earlier article. In this two-part article we will discuss the most commonly manufactured constructions that you see in the market today.

DAMASK: Damasks are traditional jacquard fabrics, which were originally woven in a single colour, where the design and ground are in contrasting weaves, (generally using warp-faced and weft-faced satin weaves).

CHINTZ: Chintz is a closely woven plain fabric, traditionally cotton, with a shiny and lustrous appearance. The fabric is processed with a glazed or calendared finish to give it a polished look.

FELT: Felt is matted fabric with a predominantly woollen composition. There are two types of felt, woven and un-woven. Felting of woven wool fabric is achieved by interlocking the natural scales on the surface of wool fibres through heat, moisture, steam, pressure and friction.

FIL COUPÉ: A small jacquard pattern on a lightweight fabric, in which the fil/weft threads connecting each pattern/motif are cut and removed from the reverse of the fabric leaving the remaining pattern/motif with frayed edges.

FAUX-LEATHER (VINYL): Polyvinyl chloride (commonly abbreviated as PVC or referred to as vinyl) is the third-most widely produced polymer after polyethylene and polypropylene. It should not be washed with cleaning solvents, but more specifically only a mixture of gentle soap and warm water.

Keep reading: www.curtainclean.co.nz...

71 days ago

Just for laughs!

Robert Anderson from

"Sometimes you might feel like no one's there for you, but you know who's always there for you?
Laundry.
Laundry will always be there for you."

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73 days ago

What Are the Basic Styles of Fabric for Curtains & Upholstery?

Robert Anderson from

There are five different styles/category of fabric that form the foundation for the vast array of curtain and upholstery fabrics you see on the market today. Each fabric style outlined below has its own unique characteristics and are produced using different techniques. Some of these fabric … View moreThere are five different styles/category of fabric that form the foundation for the vast array of curtain and upholstery fabrics you see on the market today. Each fabric style outlined below has its own unique characteristics and are produced using different techniques. Some of these fabric types will be well known to you like plain and printed fabrics, while others less so.

You may be wondering why cotton and linen for example are not included here – this is because they are a type of composition that falls within one of these categories below.
Here we give you a high-level overview of the styles of fabrics available to you for your home interior or commercial interior project.

PLAIN: Plain fabrics are characterised by simple weaves and textures not showing any complex design.
Simple weaves are for instance – hopsacks, twills, herringbones and satins. Common fabric compositions used for plain fabrics include natural fibres (cotton, linen) as well as synthetic fibres (polyester, acrylic, etc.)

Plain interior fabrics take on a simple and paired back aesthetic. Ideal for a minimalist décor, you can complement plain fabrics with more textured and tactile textiles for added interest to your home décor.

PRINTED: Printing is the process of applying coloured designs and patterns to a woven textile. One or more colours are applied to the fabric in specific parts only, using thickened dyes to prevent the colour from spreading beyond the limits of the pattern or design. In quality printed fabrics, the colour is bonded with the fibre so as to resist loss of dye from washing and friction (crocking). Printing is an ancient textile manufacturing technique of which there are five print production methods you can use:

Burn Out Printing: A process which uses chemicals, rather than colour, to burn out or dissolve away one fibre in a fabric. The purpose is to achieve a sheer design on a solid or opaque fabric. The chemicals used during production can make this fabric sensitive to ultraviolet degradation when hung in direct sunlight.

Digital Printing: Rapidly becoming a popular and commercially viable printing method due to its flexibility, precision and consistency. With this new printing technique it is now possible to print any design, even with photographic detail, onto fabric. There are no restrictions in the amount of colour that can be used.

Engraved Roller Printing: The printing method used for the majority of fabrics worldwide. The colours are printed directly onto the fabric. There must be one roller for each colour used in the print. The more colours used, the better the print definition and depth of colour. The number of colours used is printed on the left hand selvedge of a fabric along with the brand.



Keep reading: www.curtainclean.co.nz...

78 days ago

Things to Consider When Exploring Blind & Curtain Ideas

Robert Anderson from

Hoping to buy blinds or curtains but feeling a bit overwhelmed with all the choices? You might walk into a store with great curtain ideas but it’s easy to lose focus when you see all the options on the shelves.
Did you know that blinds and curtains can be energy efficient? Did you know there are… View more
Hoping to buy blinds or curtains but feeling a bit overwhelmed with all the choices? You might walk into a store with great curtain ideas but it’s easy to lose focus when you see all the options on the shelves.
Did you know that blinds and curtains can be energy efficient? Did you know there are more types of blinds that the typical shutters? There’s so much to consider!

To help you narrow down your options, here are some tips to pick the right blinds and curtains that work best for you:

1. Colour
Your choice of colour will be among the main priorities when choosing the ideal blinds or window curtains. Getting the wrong colour can ruin the aesthetic value of the whole room.
The wrong colours on the wrong windows can also lead to quick degradation. If you use strong colours like blood red on windows where the sun shines often, the colours could fade quickly. Go around this by choosing blinds or curtains with nude or neutral light colours, ensuring they’ll still look good even after fading a bit.

2. Measurements
Your second step is to make sure you get the right measurements. The general rule of thumb is that your blinds or curtain panels should be longer and wider than your windows. Drapes should go down to the floor.

If you want to make your windows and walls look bigger than they are, include a few inches above the window. Hanging your curtains 4-5 inches above the window frame creates an illusion of length.


3. Material
Blinds come in all shapes and sizes. Generic blinds like shutters or slats use aluminium or wood. Sheers use glass and these are great if you want to filter out light and striking glares in the room.

Curtains, on the other hand, come in too many options. Most use cotton, wool, silk, and linen. Thicker curtain fabric is great if you want to control temperature and prevent bright light from seeping into the room. Lighter fabric is better when you want to keep the airflow circulating.

Material choice will also affect your budget. It goes without saying that the stronger and more functional materials will cost more.

4. Style
Getting the right fabric, right measurements, and the right colour won’t do you much good if the style of the blinds or curtains doesn’t click with your personal preferences.

There are a lot of stylistic blinds and curtain ideas to choose from. Do you want to stick with plain colours and a sleek design for a modern look? Will you go for deep colours, embroidery, and frills for a Victorian or Edwardian aesthetic?

Blinds can be boring, white with no style at all, or as unique as vertical sheers using rotating glass materials.

5. Ease of Use
Generic blinds are easy to use; you have one line to pull to open or shut the blinds and another line to rotate the individual panels. Cheap curtains require you to pull them open by hand and then tie them manually but you may find a few affordable choices with their own rope.

In short, make sure you check if the curtains and blinds are easy to use. You don’t want to spend more time than you have to only to open your window and look outside.

6. Safety for Kids and Pets
Keep reading: www.curtainclean.co.nz...

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81 days ago

All About Curtain & Upholstery Fabrics

Robert Anderson from

There are five different styles/category of fabric that form the foundation for the vast array of curtain and upholstery fabrics you see on the market today. Each fabric style outlined below has its own unique characteristics and are produced using different techniques. Some of these fabric types … View moreThere are five different styles/category of fabric that form the foundation for the vast array of curtain and upholstery fabrics you see on the market today. Each fabric style outlined below has its own unique characteristics and are produced using different techniques. Some of these fabric types will be well known to you like plain and printed fabrics, while others less so.

You may be wondering why cotton and linen for example are not included here – this is because they are a type of composition that falls within one of these categories below.

Here we give you a high-level overview of the styles of fabrics available to you for your home interior or commercial interior project.

PLAIN
Plain fabrics are characterised by simple weaves and textures not showing any complex design.
Simple weaves are for instance – hopsacks, twills, herringbones and satins. Common fabric compositions used for plain fabrics include natural fibres (cotton, linen) as well as synthetic fibres (polyester, acrylic, etc.)

Plain interior fabrics take on a simple and paired back aesthetic. Ideal for a minimalist décor, you can complement plain fabrics with more textured and tactile textiles for added interest to your home décor.

PRINTED
Printing is the process of applying coloured designs and patterns to a woven textile. One or more colours are applied to the fabric in specific parts only, using thickened dyes to prevent the colour from spreading beyond the limits of the pattern or design. In quality printed fabrics, the colour is bonded with the fibre so as to resist loss of dye from washing and friction (crocking). Printing is an ancient textile manufacturing technique of which there are five print production methods you can use:

Burn Out Printing:
A process which uses chemicals, rather than colour, to burn out or dissolve away one fibre in a fabric. The purpose is to achieve a sheer design on a solid or opaque fabric. The chemicals used during production can make this fabric sensitive to ultraviolet degradation when hung in direct sunlight.

Digital Printing:
Rapidly becoming a popular and commercially viable printing method due to its flexibility, precision and consistency. With this new printing technique it is now possible to print any design, even with photographic detail, onto fabric. There are no restrictions in the amount of colour that can be used.

Engraved Roller Printing:
The printing method used for the majority of fabrics worldwide. The colours are printed directly onto the fabric. There must be one roller for each colour used in the print. The more colours used, the better the print definition and depth of colour. The number of colours used is printed on the left hand selvedge of a fabric along with the brand.

Hand Block Printing:

The oldest form of printing. Print designs are created by transferring dyestuffs onto fabric with the help of wooden, linoleum, or copper blocks. Artisans hand craft individual blocks to carry each different colour in a design and perfectly match block placement to create the all-over design.

Keep reading: www.curtainclean.co.nz...

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