Buller District, Westport

Minimalist Design in Apartment Living

Minimalist Design in Apartment Living

Ryman’s Charles Upham Village resident Di gives her design tips on how she’s turned her space into a beautiful home.

2 hours ago

Penguin protocol overlooked during emergency rock works

Nicole Mathewson Reporter from The Press

By local democracy reporter Brendon McMahon:

A local penguin trust had to intervene during emergency repairs to a temporary rock buffer, north of the Hokitika seawall, where Kororā are known to nest.

The West Coast Regional Council rockwork buffering the Hokitika Beach headland, behind the … View more
By local democracy reporter Brendon McMahon:

A local penguin trust had to intervene during emergency repairs to a temporary rock buffer, north of the Hokitika seawall, where Kororā are known to nest.

The West Coast Regional Council rockwork buffering the Hokitika Beach headland, behind the Revell Street residential area, was undermined following a storm which hit the region from April 9-12.

The section of beach - between Beach and Hampden streets - was scoured out leaving a rock overhang, which posed a potential fall risk for beach users below, council said.

Acting catchments manager Shanti Morgan said the emergency work in the past 10 days to fix that had included re-positioning rock moved during the recent storm and adding extra material to remediate the worst erosion.

The area is an active habitat for the kororā or little blue penguin, which breeds and moults on the Hokitika foreshore.

Morgan said the council had worked with the West Coast Penguin Trust and the Department of Conservation (DOC).

However, West Coast Penguin Trust manager Inger Perkins said they only became aware of the work after the Kororā habitat in beach head vegetation had been disturbed the day after the work started on April 12.

She said the breeding cycle for Kororā in vegetation on the foreshore was quite broad, meaning the presence of penguin at any time.

"Fundamentally, they could be in their nests at any time of the year."

Perkins said she was disappointed given the trust and the council had agreed protocols around emergency rock work in penguin habitats.

The council's decision on April 12 to start work meant the trust was not on the ground to point out the area is still an active breeding area, she said.

"The decision was made quite quickly without the people being involved who know that."

Perkins said when she became aware of the work the following day she asked the contractor to stop clearing vegetation due to the penguin nesting site.

The contractor was "very responsive".

Perkins said there had been no need to remove vegetation to do the emergency work, based on their previously agreed protocol with council around access to such work areas. The protocol was to construct a ramp to get access down to the beach.

"It was hugely disappointing that all the submissions, all the collaboration with council putting in signs and the GPS (co-ordinates), that none of that had come before those that were making an urgent decision. It is just frustrating ... why isn't this front of view?"

However, Perkins said council had then been "immediately responsive" when the issue was raised.

Morgan said the team considered all adverse environmental impacts prior to works occurring, including assessing the time of year penguins typically nest (July-November).

"Being outside this key season, there is very little penguin presence in the area."

Morgan said the work was completed under emergency consent conditions as a risk to public safety was identified.

"Overhanging rock that could potentially fall on beach users was removed and the site secured, making the best use of onsite material.

"Disturbance of overhanging vegetation was kept to a minimum and only removed what was necessary to ensure public safety."

Meanwhile, a proposal to do further work would be discussed at the first meeting of the Hokitika Joint committee on May 6.

This would detail options for reinstating protection against the coastal hazard.

A long-term solution and advancing a consent application is in train to extend the existing 2013-built Hokitika Seawall north as well addressing coastal inundation on the Hokitika River side.

"A hearing date to be set by the Independent Commissioner is currently pending."

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8 hours ago

Anzac Day

Anzac Day

There are opportunities across the motu for the public to come together to mark Anzac Day this year.

National Anzac Day events include the Dawn Service at 6.00am and the National Commemorative Service at 11.00am (both at Pukeahu National War Memorial Park, Wellington), and the Atatürk Memorial … View more
There are opportunities across the motu for the public to come together to mark Anzac Day this year.

National Anzac Day events include the Dawn Service at 6.00am and the National Commemorative Service at 11.00am (both at Pukeahu National War Memorial Park, Wellington), and the Atatürk Memorial Service at 2.30pm in Strathmore, Wellington. The Dawn Service and National Commemorative Service will be broadcast live by TVNZ 1 and RNZ National.

For those wanting to join the Anzac Day parade at the Dawn Service, veterans are asked to assemble on Tasman Street by 5.30am.

The Atatürk Memorial Service in Strathmore will include a wreath-laying ceremony. A shuttle service will be running from Bowes Crescent carpark to the memorial site for anyone who may require assistance accessing the site.

For more information about Anzac Day, visit the Manatū Taonga Ministry for Culture and Heritage website or see the Pukeahu National War Memorial Park Facebook page.

To find out about events in your local community, visit the Royal New Zealand Returned and Services’ Association’s website or get in touch with your local council.
Find out more

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12 hours ago

Flood and coastal protection at stake through West Coast meetings

Nicole Mathewson Reporter from The Press

By local democracy reporter Brendon McMahon:

Members of special rating districts up and down the West Coast should attend their annual meetings, elected representatives say.

The West Coast Regional Council is holding a round of annual meetings in the next month for each of the two dozen … View more
By local democracy reporter Brendon McMahon:

Members of special rating districts up and down the West Coast should attend their annual meetings, elected representatives say.

The West Coast Regional Council is holding a round of annual meetings in the next month for each of the two dozen special rating areas it administers on behalf of local ratepayers for flood or coastal protection assets.

Council chairperson Peter Haddock said ratepayers within each special rating district give the mandate to the annual asset maintenance budget presented by council, and the consequent levy above their general rates.

That was why it was so important for people to attend their annual local rating district meeting to tell council what they wanted, he said.

"It's the people that make the decision on what their budget is for the year. That's the reason they should attend," Haddock said.

Nearly 75% of West Coast residents are affected by one of 22 special rating districts dotted up and down the 650km long region.

They are mainly for small rural or farming communities but include the three main towns and the tourist hotspots like Punakaiki and Franz Josef.

As the council's rating mess emerged in late 2023 some ratepayers such as the Greymouth floodwall area were shocked to find substantial special rating increases.

CHaddock said in the end rating district members had a significant say.

"The regional council run the programme for the rating district members - it is important people turnup, so they can have their say."

The reserves held ensured money in the pot when unforeseen events such as storm damage came up.

Haddock said this was demonstrable at Punakaiki following a battering 10 days ago of its coastal defences and the annual meeting there last week demonstrated "good conversations" to be realistic.

"There was varying people from commercial operators down to people with holiday homes.

"Everyone is concerned. They know that if they don't continue to maintain the walls, it could fall behind and then they are up for a big bill."

The Karamea meeting saw about 50 show up but many had a false impression for the meeting.

"I think they thought it was (for) the long-term plan submissions rather than the rating district."

A private landfill and the use of 1080 were among unrelated issues brought up.

"A lot of people, I think, don't realise what the regional council does," Haddock said.

Council deputy chairperson Brett Cummings said it was obvious a lot of attendees at the Karamea meeting came to raise other issues -- in itself not a bad thing.

"They thought it was a meeting about rates. A lot of people didn't understand what a rating district is, and they possibly should … there's a lot of confusion."

Cummings said the issues at the heart of the purpose of rating districts -- flood and inundation -- were only going to escalate for them.

"The amounts are getting bigger because the problems are getting bigger … I think a lot of them are beginning to understand we are not spending (the rating district) money ourselves."

Cummings said some meetings also exposed a gulf between the priorities of local landowners and those who did not live in the district but had an interest.

An example was the recent Kongahu meeting where the locals were "all for" addressing an outbreak of the listed water weed Parrots feather in the area but with an absentee landowner
haggling over that priority, he said.

At the same time, the council had a big job ahead of it with the first formal meeting in May of the new Franz Josef/Waiho joint rating district, where council had been "through a torrid time," after years of no meetings for the locals to have their say.

8 hours ago

Say goodbye to tyre waste

Tyrewise

About 40% of the 6.5 million tyres Kiwis use every year are recycled, repurposed, or used as tyre-derived fuel. But the rest end up in landfills, stockpiled or dumped.

The good news is now there’s an easy solution to all that tyre waste. It’s called Tyrewise and is New Zealand’s first … View more
About 40% of the 6.5 million tyres Kiwis use every year are recycled, repurposed, or used as tyre-derived fuel. But the rest end up in landfills, stockpiled or dumped.

The good news is now there’s an easy solution to all that tyre waste. It’s called Tyrewise and is New Zealand’s first national tyre recycling scheme.

Tyrewise ensures that tyres in Aotearoa New Zealand are recycled or repurposed properly, saving millions from going to the landfill.

Find out more about the scheme online.
Find out more

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2 days ago

Poll: Does the building consent process need to change?

The Team from Neighbourly.co.nz

We definitely need homes that are fit to live in but there are often frustrations when it comes to getting consent to modify your own home.
Do you think changes need made to the current process for building consent? Share your thoughts below.

Type 'Not For Print' if you wish your … View more
We definitely need homes that are fit to live in but there are often frustrations when it comes to getting consent to modify your own home.
Do you think changes need made to the current process for building consent? Share your thoughts below.

Type 'Not For Print' if you wish your comments to be excluded from the Conversations column of your local paper.

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Does the building consent process need to change?
  • 91.8% Yes
    91.8% Complete
  • 7.8% No
    7.8% Complete
  • 0.5% Other - I'll share below!
    0.5% Complete
850 votes
20 hours ago

Know Thy Neighbour? We are getting there!

The Team from Neighbourly.co.nz

We are loving seeing everyone's posts about themselves on our Know Thy Neighbour page.

Check out the neighbours in your area, you might find a walking group or choir to join and you might learn a few more neighbours names!

Feel like getting involved? Introduce yourself too, you might win… View more
We are loving seeing everyone's posts about themselves on our Know Thy Neighbour page.

Check out the neighbours in your area, you might find a walking group or choir to join and you might learn a few more neighbours names!

Feel like getting involved? Introduce yourself too, you might win one of our $50 Prezzy® card spot prizes...

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1 day ago

Have you got a great recipe for chokos?

Mei Leng Wong Reporter from NZ Gardener & Get Growing

We're looking for delicious choko recipes to feature in NZ Gardener's June issue. Send your family's favourite ways to eat this versatile crop to mailbox@nzgardener.co.nz by April 30, 2024. Every published recipe wins a copy of the June issue of NZ Gardener.

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1 day ago

ANZAC LUNCH SPECIAL AT THE TERRACES

St. Andrew's Village

Join us for a special memorial lunch on the 25th April at the Terraces Restaurant, a hidden gem nestled in the heart of Glendowie, boasting stunning views of the Auckland Waitamata harbour.

At only $38, we serve Savannah Beef Fillet, Pumpkin & Feta Roulade, Caulilini, Port Jus and Dessert … View more
Join us for a special memorial lunch on the 25th April at the Terraces Restaurant, a hidden gem nestled in the heart of Glendowie, boasting stunning views of the Auckland Waitamata harbour.

At only $38, we serve Savannah Beef Fillet, Pumpkin & Feta Roulade, Caulilini, Port Jus and Dessert Passion Fruit Tart, Toasted Meringue, Coconut Sorbet.

ANZAC DAY for Lunch Dine in only. NO PUBLIC HOLIDAY SURCHARGE APPLIES. Call 09 926 7973 to book now.
Find out more

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1 day ago

Suspicious E coli levels at Franz Josef

Nicole Mathewson Reporter from The Press

By local democracy reporter Brendon McMahon:

E coli found at the Waiho River in January appears to be linked to seepage near a controversial stopbank and the Franz Josef sewage ponds.

West Coast Regional Council environmental consent monitoring staff detected "a spike" in E coli … View more
By local democracy reporter Brendon McMahon:

E coli found at the Waiho River in January appears to be linked to seepage near a controversial stopbank and the Franz Josef sewage ponds.

West Coast Regional Council environmental consent monitoring staff detected "a spike" in E coli discharge levels to the Westland District Council's wastewater treatment cells after the Waiho River shifted course in mid-January.

The finding was flagged in council's first quarterly compliance and enforcement report for 2024.

The river began running hard up against the Westland District Council's Havill Wall, in front of the wastewater treatment plan, following a storm in January.

That event saw the Waiho River's avulsion escalate into the separate Tatare Stream catchment to the north.

The Havill Wall was controversially built following a moderate flood event in April 2016 where the river overtopped a stopbank to the north of Franz Josef township. It flooded the now abandoned Scenic Hotel site and swamped the district council's current wastewater treatment site.

The council's quarterly compliance report said the E.coli discharge to the treatment plant's disposal cells was found during regular monitoring by staff.

"Surveillance of the site found an unusual stream of water emanating from below the site," the report said.

A council compliance officer took samples of the surface water below the site.

"This was found to be contaminated with E coli bacteria.

"At the time these samples were taken the Waiho River was pushing up against the Havill Wall outside of the wastewater treatment ponds," the report said.

Subsequent additional protection work by the district council to stop the river from cutting back up towards the ponds had covered over the water sample area.

"The area sampled is now under these works."

Further inquiries were ongoing "to pinpoint" the source of the contamination.

Westland District Council chief executive Simon Bastion on April 18 said his council had been advised by the regional council an area of ponding below the level of the oxidation ponds had been sampled and found to be positive for E coli.

"The level of E coli can fluctuate in any standing or flowing water body depending on natural contamination via wildlife or human interference factors," he said.

Both councils then visited the oxidation ponds.

"A very minor clear stream of river water was visible and flowing along the toe of the stopbank and ponding near the base of Maturation pond 1. This was believed to be the cause of the positive E coli sample."

Bastion said the district council was confident its sewerage treatment ponds at the site were not permeable or posed a risk to the river.

"The new primary and secondary oxidation ponds are lined with PE (Polyethylene) to ensure they do not leak. The oxidation ponds are fit for purpose and have operated satisfactorily since commissioning in 2020."

Bastion said the final effluent disposal cells for the site were located further away from the Waiho River and complied with their Resource Consent.

The council's iwi partner, Te Rūnanga o Makaawhio, were also approached by LDR.

Makaawhio chairperson Paul Madgwick said it was the first he had heard of the incident.

Madgwick said his expectation was that council would have informed the rūnunga about the finding in the spirit of their joint agreement.

The council not keeping them in the loop undermined the formal Mana Whakahono ā Rohe agreement between Makaawhio and the council, he said.

The agreement, first signed four years ago, sets out a working relationship where council and iwi work together on resource management issues.

Regional council chief executive Darryl Lew said the E coli initially found at the site had disappeared, following more tests.

"The recent sampling is clear. That doesn't mean to say we've cleared that line of inquiry," Lew said.

He believed Makaawhio had previously been briefed about the contamination but it was a case of nothing further emerging to keep them in the loop.

However, Lew said he would communicate further.

"We certainly informed the district council."

Escherichia coli (E coli) is a bacteria commonly found in the lower intestine of warm-blooded organisms. Some E coli strain can cause serious food poisoning.

1 day ago

Anzac Day Dawn Service 2024

Upper Hutt City Council

Join us for the 2024 Anzac Day Dawn Service, on Thursday 25 April. Anzac Day is the official day of remembrance for the Australians and New Zealanders who fought and died in the First World War.

5.30 AM - Dawn Parade assembles at Queen Street
5:45 AM - March begins
6.00 AM - A Service of … View more
Join us for the 2024 Anzac Day Dawn Service, on Thursday 25 April. Anzac Day is the official day of remembrance for the Australians and New Zealanders who fought and died in the First World War.

5.30 AM - Dawn Parade assembles at Queen Street
5:45 AM - March begins
6.00 AM - A Service of dedication at Upper Hutt Civic Centre
11.00 AM - Memorial Service at St John's Church

The Dawn Parade will assemble at Queen Street and march down Pine Avenue, along Main Street, down Wilson Street to line up outside of the Upper Hutt Civic Centre.
Find out more

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1 day ago

Care you can count on

Ernest Rutherford Retirement Village

With the many friends she has made and the special bond she shares with her caregivers, the village has become an extension of Dora’s family.

Click to learn more about Dora’s experience at a Ryman village.

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1 day ago

Haven Falls Funeral Home Ki Rotorua

Haven Falls

Haven Falls are very blessed to be opening their new branch in Rotorua.

Located at 271 Old Taupo Road, Rotorua these facilities offer a large chapel, dining hall and extended off road parking.

We invite you at anytime to pop in and speak with one of our team members and have a look around … View more
Haven Falls are very blessed to be opening their new branch in Rotorua.

Located at 271 Old Taupo Road, Rotorua these facilities offer a large chapel, dining hall and extended off road parking.

We invite you at anytime to pop in and speak with one of our team members and have a look around the facilities offered.

We operate 24 hours 7 days a week.
0800 428366
Find out more

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3 days ago

Rotten egg smell at Greymouth landfill detailed

Nicole Mathewson Reporter from The Press

By local democracy reporter Brendon McMahon:

A 'rotten egg' smell at a private landfill on the West Coast could be caused by crushed and wet gib board, recently released documents show.

The West Coast Regional Council has accepted fresh applications from Taylorville Resource Park … View more
By local democracy reporter Brendon McMahon:

A 'rotten egg' smell at a private landfill on the West Coast could be caused by crushed and wet gib board, recently released documents show.

The West Coast Regional Council has accepted fresh applications from Taylorville Resource Park (TRP), 5km east of Greymouth, to vary its consents.

It includes a new assessment for the applicant, which details the cause of the pungent odour that has resulted in numerous complaints to the council in the past 15 months.

The air assessment says the saturation of gib board in anaerobic conditions significantly enhanced rotting, causing the generation of a rotten egg smell at the site.

"The best way to address the production of sulphide gas is to prevent it at the source," the Davis Ogilvie report said.

It is not yet clear if latest application by TRP will result in a public resource consent hearing.

The controversial site was recently hit with an abatement notice from the Environmental Protection Authority (EPA), after council called in the authority in January to take over its investigation of the site.

It followed a string of complaints and previous abatements in 2023, including neighbours raising concerns about a pungent smell.

The EPA slapped down an abatement in mid-March after finding contaminated leachate water collected in a landfill cell at the site was being released from a sediment pond.

Taylorville Resource Park has three months to meet the "required environmental standards". In the meantime, the landfill is allowed to operate, the EPA said on March 18.

LDR approached Taylorville Resource Park on April 18 for comment on its latest applications.

A WorkSafe investigation into an incident at the site last August, in which two workers were overcome with gas, is still ongoing.

The landfill has now applied to bring the operation in line with the Class 3 Managed Fill guidelines under the Waste Management Institute New Zealand Technical Guidelines for Disposal to Land.

It is also seeks to vary its discharge consent for water containing "landfill leachate", and a separate consent to discharge landfill gas to air.

The periods sought are for 25 years.

A bundle of documents lodged with council include a discharge to air assessment by Davis Ogilvie for Taylorville Resource Park in February this year.

It says the potential for gas generation at the site was originally assessed to be "less than minor" in 2021, and possible adverse effects beyond the site were thought to be unlikely at the time.

What had subsequently emerged could be attributed to:
* Expansion of the site beyond the area originally assessed;
* The deposit of "a large volume" of shredded gib board;
* Disposal of tomato vine material, which may have accelerated hydrogen sulphide gas;
* Issues with the leachate drain and sump from one of the site's cells leading to about 1.5m of water ponding in the base.

Davis Ogilvie also said gas generation at the site could increase when demolition gib board material was crushed, compacted or hit by rainwater.

Repair of a sump to limit water ponding in a dump cell, sealing of the leachate discharge system to minimise emissions, and installation of a gas treatment system to absorb gas had all been undertaken to try and fix the issue.

The documents also include an asbestos management plan and an assessment of environmental effects (AEE) from May 2023.

The assessment notes planning and hazard information held by the Grey District Council did not consider the site "prone to landslides".

Another memorandum backgrounds Taylorville Resource Park's desire to simplify the acceptance of contaminated soil at the site to move beyond the current case by case basis requiring council approval, which it says is onerous.

It noted existing lined cells and the collection and treatment of leachate at the site exceeded current monitoring and engineering requirements.

1 day ago

The mobile breast screen unit is coming to Otaki

Mid Central DHB

The dates for the Otaki site are Monday 29th of April- Wednesday 22nd of May 2024.

The site is located at Te Wānanga o Raukawa, 144 Tasman Road.

Click here to book an appointment or call us at 0800 270 200.
Find out more

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3 days ago

This week's prize draw!

The Team from Neighbourly.co.nz

Winners of the $100 Farmers vouchers in this week's Neighbourly prize draw are:

Gustavo Silva from Auckland Central

Mary Halliday from Port Waikato

Emily Taylor from Rolleston

View more
Winners of the $100 Farmers vouchers in this week's Neighbourly prize draw are:

Gustavo Silva from Auckland Central

Mary Halliday from Port Waikato

Emily Taylor from Rolleston

Neil Morrison from Invercargill

Get in touch with our Neighbourly Helpdesk team before the 30th of April to claim your prize by heading here.

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1 day ago

Future’s bright for Porirua rangatahi

Porirua City Council

Te Rauparaha Arena will be bursting at the seams with college students from across Porirua on 9 May as they explore career opportunities.

The community-led Careers Expo, running from 9.30am to 5.30pm, will be the city’s largest expo in many years. There will be more than 70 stalls showcasing … View more
Te Rauparaha Arena will be bursting at the seams with college students from across Porirua on 9 May as they explore career opportunities.

The community-led Careers Expo, running from 9.30am to 5.30pm, will be the city’s largest expo in many years. There will be more than 70 stalls showcasing career and education pathways, as well as current vacancies with local employers.

Students from all of Porirua’s colleges will have the opportunity to visit the expo, with the event also open to students in the wider Wellington region, as well as those who have already left school and are still investigating their job opportunities.

There will be tech workshops and speakers from a range of Wellington tech companies.

The expo is a collaborative effort between a group of Porirua workforce partners: Porirua City Council, Ngāti Toa Rangatira, Ministry of Social Development, Ministry of Education, Kāinga Ora, Le Fale Jobs and Skills Hub, Partners Porirua, and the colleges.
Find out more

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5 days ago

Coast council staff increase defended

Nicole Mathewson Reporter from The Press

By local democracy reporter Brendon McMahon:

An increase in staff numbers to nearly 90 at the West Coast Regional Council is defensible, says its chief executive.

It follows finger pointing by former chairperson Allan Birchfield who tried to pin down CEO Darryl Lew during an April meeting on … View more
By local democracy reporter Brendon McMahon:

An increase in staff numbers to nearly 90 at the West Coast Regional Council is defensible, says its chief executive.

It follows finger pointing by former chairperson Allan Birchfield who tried to pin down CEO Darryl Lew during an April meeting on the exact number of staff he employed.

This week Birchfield said the figure was around 60 back in April 2022 at council, including West Coast Civil Defence Emergency Management staff.

Lew initially said the number of staff was somewhere in the 70s before acknowledging it was nearer 80; he promised to forward the exact numbers after the meeting.

On April 16, Lew said any suggestion of a significant increase of staff at the small council is not credible.

"I reject that the staff numbers in this organisation have increased significantly. They have not.

"This organisation has been carrying a substantial vacuum and in the past has had trouble recruiting. As a result I have had to employ contractors."

That practice going back several years had never been sustainable.
"It had got out of balance here because of the lack of ability to recruit."

Lew confirmed the council has 66 full-time staff, 17 part-time staff, and five casuals.

The council has struggled to retain or recruit staff for several years including having three chief executives in three years when Birchfield was chairperson, prior to his sacking a year ago.

Lew arrived at council last June as the fourth chief executive in four years.

Meanwhile, the elected council confirmed a policy of returning to in-house direct employment rather than relying on external contractors to plug gaps, particularly as it had to prove to Government it could manage the large Westport flood resilience contract build.

Lew said it was not easy to quantify the use of contractors in proportion to the permanent positions council needed but had been unable to fill.

"It's a very difficult question because they come in for projects and then go: it's a point in time."

However, Lew said the council was working towards having the expertise permanently on board.

"As a general trend, this organisation has been using over its history, and before I arrived, more contractors than I am comfortable with.

"Some have come with a very large price. For our ratepayers, its better and much more advantageous if we can employ in-house because it comes at a lessor cost," Lew said.

He said council would still need to employ contractors for specialised areas from time to time.

LDR has previously requested the cost to council of employing contractors. The council in a response early this year to a Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act request said the costs and numbers were difficult to separate from the CAPEX of council projects.

Lew said council recruiting had turned a corner in the past nine months and it was now "highly successful" in attracting "the right talent" across the organisation.

For example, the council has gone from having no in-house finance team last June to having four chartered accountants on staff.

Lew said the council also had its first charted engineer on board for at least 30 years. Senior engineering team leader Peter Blackwood, who is domiciled in the Bay of Plenty, is coming to council to lead a renewed in-house team.

Aaron Prendergast of the central North Island will continue act as corporate services manager for the first year of the 2024-34 Long Term Plan.

He has been consulting for council on its audit, systems review and Long Term Process since last year.

1 day ago

Poll: Where is Everil Orr Living Independent Living and Care Centre located?

Everil Orr Village

Everil Orr Living is open to view, and you are invited!

Tuesday, 30th April
9:30 am to 1:30 pm (Care Centre)

10 am – 2 pm (Apartments – Independent Living)

We’re right in the heart of Mt Albert, with our Independent Living Apartments and Care facility open for view.

We have a … View more
Everil Orr Living is open to view, and you are invited!

Tuesday, 30th April
9:30 am to 1:30 pm (Care Centre)

10 am – 2 pm (Apartments – Independent Living)

We’re right in the heart of Mt Albert, with our Independent Living Apartments and Care facility open for view.

We have a good selection of brand new and preloved apartments available, as well as care suites if you or a loved one need rest home or hospital-level care.

We’d love to show you around, so please make your booking today.
Find out more

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Where is Everil Orr Living Independent Living and Care Centre located?
  • 11.5% Mt. Eden
    11.5% Complete
  • 80.8% Mt. Albert
    80.8% Complete
  • 3.8% St Heliers
    3.8% Complete
  • 3.8% Parnell
    3.8% Complete
26 votes
5 days ago

West Coast swim spot testing clear of E-coli

Nicole Mathewson Reporter from The Press

By local democracy reporter Brendon McMahon:

The latest testing at a popular Westport swimming beach appear to show an all clear for E coli.

Earlier samples over summer had flagged contamination from cattle, according to a report to the West Coast Regional Council.

The test site in … View more
By local democracy reporter Brendon McMahon:

The latest testing at a popular Westport swimming beach appear to show an all clear for E coli.

Earlier samples over summer had flagged contamination from cattle, according to a report to the West Coast Regional Council.

The test site in question, Marrs Beach on the south side of the Buller River has been a focus for the regional council for years however it has had difficulty tracing the sources of e-coli contamination.

Martins Creek enters the river near Marrs Beach and council has formed a catchment group to try and address contamination issues with landholders in the catchment.

Water quality sampling results provided alongside a report to the council's Resource Management Committee gives an overview of results for November 2023 to March 2024.

In the main, the majority of 20 sites tested through summer were in the 'very low risk' category for swimmers.

However beaches around Westport periodically blipped through summer.

Marrs Beach had two flags, in mid-November and mid-January, where testing found the water was of 'moderate to high risk' to swimmers due to E.coli exceedances (between 550 and 280 per 100ml).

Shingle Beach on the opposite side of the Buller River had three moderate to high risk flags: one in mid-December and two through the middle of January.

Other exceedance of water quality standards across the region included one moderate to high risk flag each in mid-January at the popular Taylorville swimming hole in the Grey River, and at Nelson Creek; at Westport North Beach (mid-December) and Punakaiki River (mid-January).

The council undertakes weekly contact recreation water quality sampling at the swimming spots from the end of October to late March.
The report to this week's Resource Management Committee said the last sampling period from February 19 to March 20 did not flag any exceedance despite "significant rainfall" preceding sampling in some locations.

Escherichia coli (E coli) is a bacteria commonly found in the lower intestine of warm-blooded organisms. Some E.coli strain can cause serious food poisoning.

2 days ago

Bookfest: Giant Charity Book Sale

Heretaunga Bookfest Charitable Trust

Bookfest is back for the first weekend in May!

Come on down to Whirinaki Whare Taonga (formerly Expressions) for a huge selection of books in over 40 categories, as well as magazines, games, jigsaw puzzles, CD’s, DVD’s and vinyl records (no
audio or video tapes).

Come along and … View more
Bookfest is back for the first weekend in May!

Come on down to Whirinaki Whare Taonga (formerly Expressions) for a huge selection of books in over 40 categories, as well as magazines, games, jigsaw puzzles, CD’s, DVD’s and vinyl records (no
audio or video tapes).

Come along and make your pre-winter selections at this major event, there’s plenty to choose from!

Proceeds are for the benefit of the community in various ways.
Whirinaki Whare Taonga (formerly Expressions)
Sat 4th May 9am-5pm
Sun 5th May 9am-3pm
Find out more

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6 days ago

Turn downsizing stress into strength

Ernest Rutherford Retirement Village

Downsizing can open the door to a new stage of your life that is rich in opportunity. However, it can be a daunting prospect. If you are embarking on a new chapter of life, the thought of shedding familiar possessions can feel even more stressful. This can be true even if the life changes are a … View moreDownsizing can open the door to a new stage of your life that is rich in opportunity. However, it can be a daunting prospect. If you are embarking on a new chapter of life, the thought of shedding familiar possessions can feel even more stressful. This can be true even if the life changes are a good thing, such as a move to somewhere you will love to live.

Once you understand why you have this feeling, you can reframe it as creating a new environment that will support your present life while reminding you of your best experiences.

Click read more for the full article.

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2 days ago

Bookfest: Giant Charity Book Sale

Heretaunga Bookfest Charitable Trust

Bookfest is back for the first weekend in May!

Come on down to Whirinaki Whare Taonga (formerly Expressions) for a huge selection of books in over 40 categories, as well as magazines, games, jigsaw puzzles, CD’s, DVD’s and vinyl records (no
audio or video tapes).

Come along and … View more
Bookfest is back for the first weekend in May!

Come on down to Whirinaki Whare Taonga (formerly Expressions) for a huge selection of books in over 40 categories, as well as magazines, games, jigsaw puzzles, CD’s, DVD’s and vinyl records (no
audio or video tapes).

Come along and make your pre-winter selections at this major event, there’s plenty to choose from!

Proceeds are for the benefit of the community in various ways.
Whirinaki Whare Taonga (formerly Expressions)
Sat 4th May 9am-5pm
Sun 5th May 9am-3pm
Find out more

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6 days ago

Minimalist Design in Apartment Living

The Team from Ryman Healthcare

Ryman’s Charles Upham Retirement Village resident Di is a former fashion designer, artist and self-confessed shoe hoarder who travels, still paints and has stamped her eclectic minimalist style on her apartment.

She gives us her top 3 design tips on how she’s turned her space into a … View more
Ryman’s Charles Upham Retirement Village resident Di is a former fashion designer, artist and self-confessed shoe hoarder who travels, still paints and has stamped her eclectic minimalist style on her apartment.

She gives us her top 3 design tips on how she’s turned her space into a beautiful home.
Find out more

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2 days ago

Need Dentures? We can help

Dyverse Dentures

Call now for free consultation

• Complete Denture
• Partial Denture
• Same day Denture relines and repairs
• Provide WINZ Quote and insurance claim.

Contact us at 09 634 4543.
12C Waddon Place, Māngere, Auckland 2022
Find out more

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9 days ago

Poll: Could we live without public bins?

The Team from Neighbourly.co.nz

Many public rubbish bins are being removed by councils due to the large costs of regularly emptying them. Do you think we can adapt and live without them?

Type 'Not For Print' if you wish your comments to be excluded from the We Say You Say column of your local paper.

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Could we live without public bins?
  • 11.6% Yes
    11.6% Complete
  • 87.8% No
    87.8% Complete
  • 0.6% Other - I'll share below
    0.6% Complete
2596 votes
2 days ago

Last chance for tickets!

Heart Foundation Lotteries

Don’t miss out! For only $15 a ticket, you could be in to win this brand-new, fully furnished Jennian home located in stunning Taupō, worth just over $1 million.

Featuring three bedrooms, two bathrooms and an open plan kitchen, living and dining area, this home is waiting to be lived in and … View more
Don’t miss out! For only $15 a ticket, you could be in to win this brand-new, fully furnished Jennian home located in stunning Taupō, worth just over $1 million.

Featuring three bedrooms, two bathrooms and an open plan kitchen, living and dining area, this home is waiting to be lived in and loved by its new owners.

Make this property your permanent residence, a holiday home, rent it or even sell it! Get your tickets today.
Find out more

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8 days ago

Level of contamination ‘not known’ in about 70% of West Coast sites

Nicole Mathewson Reporter from The Press

By local democracy reporter Brendon McMahon:

There are still big gaps in the knowledge about the number of contaminated and environmentally hazardous sites on the West Coast.

The West Coast Regional Council's Hazardous Activities and Industries List (HAIL) identifies 533 sites across the… View more
By local democracy reporter Brendon McMahon:

There are still big gaps in the knowledge about the number of contaminated and environmentally hazardous sites on the West Coast.

The West Coast Regional Council's Hazardous Activities and Industries List (HAIL) identifies 533 sites across the region.

A new report by council says the presence or extent of contamination is "not known" for 70% of the sites.

At this stage council staff resources dedicated to HAIL and contaminated work represents about one half-time staff member, annually, the report said.

The sites represent a range of past activities and industries in the region.

The most common are: service stations (40%), landfills (10%), power substations (5%), previous mining exploration (4%), and previous gas works (4%).

Councillor Peter Ewen has repeatedly called for the region's HAIL list to be brought up to speed and thanked council staff for the updated list.

"It's very good to have this (but) there are a number of concerns," he said.

"The word that springs up in this report is a lot of sites have been 'assessed' but a lot haven't."

Ewen said the council should be seeking external funding to get a better handle on the scope of hazardous sites across the region, including former rubbish dumps.

"We've got to get some significant financial assistance to address this, and I think we should be accessing that."

The council HAIL register report included additional information from the Department of Conservation noting that it had 301 hazardous sites under its administration.

Only 48 of these were already included in the council list.

DOC-managed contaminated sites were typically former coal or gold mine sites.

Ewen asked the council draft a letter to the Director General of DOC to address:

* The department's work programme, resources and funding dedicated to its West Coast HAIL sites;
* That DOC should inform the council of any discharges occurring from their sites, "that are not already consented";
* Evidence of any Government funding received by DOC to deal with contaminated West Coast sites.

Ewen said the region did not want the spectacle of another Fox Glacier dump disaster.

"It's an issue that is not going to go away if we ignore it. Another day, it's another dump that gets washed away. We've got over 300 of the them, and most are not consented," he said.

"The thing I'm concerned about is the guardian of the environment, DOC, has a lot of these sites. They must know where they are."

The council agreed on April 9 to adopt Cr Ewen's recommendations.

DOC has been approached by LDR for comment.

Council science manager Jonny Horrox said council had to "give effect" to the national legislation on the risk contaminated land poses.

He said council was required to identify sites that posed or might pose health risks. This was to manage the risk appropriately on behalf of the community for land use changes or proposed earthworks.

Horrix said of the 301 DOC sites, about 48 were already listed by council.

* Eight are within the department's national 50 high risk sites;
* The presence or extent of contamination was unclear for the majority of DOC sites;
* The DOC sites represented a range of activities and industries in the region, "but mining is the main HAIL activity for 80% of sites.

Horrix said various terms had previously been used but HAIL was best understood.

"Sites are on the register as a precautionary measure ... contaminants may or may not be present."

However the HAIL register was to inform future decisions around site use, he said.

"It does not mean all sites are contaminated."

Photos:
* The former Prohibition Mine site at Waiuta cost the Department of Conservation $2.6 million to clean-up from 2016-18 of what had been assessed as the most toxic mine site in New Zealand and the second most arsenic-contaminated site in the world. (Department of Conservation)
* The top of the former Denniston Incline on the Denniston Plateau north of Westport. The area is one among many historic mining sites managed by the Department of Conservation on the West Coast where there is a legacy of contamination such as acid mine drainage. (Brendon McMahon)

3 days ago

A Whole New Lifestyle

Acacia Cove

CARE, COMMUNITY, AND CONNECTION
Acacia Cove, a country-style village situated on the beautiful Wattle Downs Peninsula has 31 weekly activities.

For those who appreciate the tranquility of an estuary setting Acacia Cove has it all, as well as its own restaurant, heated indoor pool, library, … View more
CARE, COMMUNITY, AND CONNECTION
Acacia Cove, a country-style village situated on the beautiful Wattle Downs Peninsula has 31 weekly activities.

For those who appreciate the tranquility of an estuary setting Acacia Cove has it all, as well as its own restaurant, heated indoor pool, library, bowling green and gym.

Whether you choose to live in a villa or one of our luxurious apartments, you’ll have the security of a 24 hour, fully monitored emergency call system built in.
If you’re aged 60 or over, value your independence but want greater security, come and have a look at the superb properties we have to offer.

Contact long time manager Bruce to book a visit today!
(09) 268 8522.
admin@ocaciacove.co.nz
Find out more

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9 days ago

Coast regional council flags more user pays

Nicole Mathewson Reporter from The Press

By local democracy reporter Brendon McMahon:

West Coast residents face more "user pay" services and a hefty hike in rates under the West Coast Regional Council's proposed long-term plan (LTP).

Chairperson Peter Haddock said the council knew the proposed increases will be … View more
By local democracy reporter Brendon McMahon:

West Coast residents face more "user pay" services and a hefty hike in rates under the West Coast Regional Council's proposed long-term plan (LTP).

Chairperson Peter Haddock said the council knew the proposed increases will be challenging for some.

"But if we don't make these changes now, we are just kicking the can down the road."

Ratepayers should brace for a range of rises in the LTP 2024-25, including a proposed 27% general rates increase, a 22.7% rise in the uniform annual general charge (UAG), and jumps in the targeted rates for individual flood rating districts.

The council is also proposing to increase user fees and charges.

"The fairest approach is for those who use our services should pay for them," Haddock said on April 11.

He said the council wants feedback on is how to pay for under-invested council systems and processes, while demand for services "keeps growing".

"We are unable to carry out basic functions and services to meet community expectations, particularly in the back office financial area. This is now starting to seriously affect all ratepayers," Haddock said.

Relying on debt to cover day-to-day operational costs was "not sustainable".

"We have a big programme of work ahead of us so we have tried to lessen and smooth the load by spreading the increase over several years where we can."

The council is consulting a total budget increase of 20.8% for 2024-25, partially funded by borrowing alongside its preferred 27% general rates increase.

The council proposed initially borrowing for some activities until it can return to a stage of paying of debt in the next few years, Haddock said.

The rates had been kept "artificially low" and council had "no option but to take this approach to catch up", he said.

The council believed the alternative 44% rates-alone funding option in 2024-25 would be "unacceptable" to residents.

Formal feedback is also being sought on the future of Predator Free Te Kinga, as its external funding by Predator-free 2050 is due to run out in 2026-27.

Haddock said Te Kinga was "a special project for the region" with gains in species protection, but it needed ratepayer finding to continue.

Other key proposals flagged in the LTP:
* Formal transfer of the ownership of the Grey Floodwall and the Havill Wall (Franz Josef) assets to the regional council -- in line with flood and erosion protection asset management on behalf of 23 rating districts as a core function of council.
* Increases to targeted rates and the UAG.

The UAG will increase from $155.69 in 2023-24 to $192.59 in 2024-25. This fixed charge per property does not discriminate on location or property type.

About 75% of West Coast properties received some benefit from the region's 23 rating districts flood protection assets.

Many needed investment and work to maintain them, "or to potentially increase their standard of protection which will drive targeted rate increases".

That includes a bump of more than 500% for Westport's rating district in the next three years.

Consultation runs from April 12 until May 10, with public hearings anticipated from May 20 before council adopts the plan in June.

The Consultation Document and supporting information can be viewed at www.wcrc.govt.nz....

Copies will also be available to view at the Westport, Greymouth and Hokitika libraries and the Reefton Service Centre from April 15.

3 days ago

Witness history in the making

Wellington Phoenix

Your Wellington Phoenix are playing their final regular season game on Saturday 27th April at Sky Stadium, in partnership with Layer3.

They’re calling on Wellingtonians to rally behind the team to cheer on the Nix to the top of the table! Help them make history as they chase the premiership … View more
Your Wellington Phoenix are playing their final regular season game on Saturday 27th April at Sky Stadium, in partnership with Layer3.

They’re calling on Wellingtonians to rally behind the team to cheer on the Nix to the top of the table! Help them make history as they chase the premiership title, so get your tickets now! Plus, kids go free.

Help them reach their goal of exceeding 21,000 fans in the stands to set a new all-time season attendance record.
Secure your seat!

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4 days ago

Get painting with Resene plant-based paints!

Resene

Plant-based paints are made just like normal paint but everything in the tin comes from plants and minerals.

Plus they’re Eco Choice approved with low odour and easy water clean-up, so you can paint or stain your place with ease.

Available from Resene ColorShops.
Find out more

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5 days ago

Commemorate Anzac Day on 25 April

Auckland Council

Remember our servicemen and servicewomen past and present by attending an Anzac Day service on Thursday 25 April.

Visit for a full list of services across the region.
Find out more

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5 days ago

The mobile breast screen unit is coming to Otaki

Mid Central DHB

The dates for the Otaki site are Monday 29th of April- Wednesday 22nd of May 2024.

The site is located at Te Wānanga o Raukawa, 144 Tasman Road.

Click here to book an appointment or call us at 0800 270 200.
Book Now

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