Mangere East, Auckland

7 hours ago

What are you looking forward to at the traffic light system?

Josephine Franks Reporter from Manukau Courier

Kia ora neighbours, the traffic lights are in sight and we'd love to know what you're most looking forward to once Aucklanders have more freedom. Maybe it's being reunited with family outside Auckland, going to the pub, or just being able to hang out inside a friend's house … View moreKia ora neighbours, the traffic lights are in sight and we'd love to know what you're most looking forward to once Aucklanders have more freedom. Maybe it's being reunited with family outside Auckland, going to the pub, or just being able to hang out inside a friend's house (and use their loo!). Comment below to share your thoughts - use NFP if you don't want it published - or email josephine.franks@stuff.co.nz

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3 days ago

Poll: Where would you most like to go once NZ borders open?

Collision Connect

Collision Connect is redefining collision repairs. We are based in both Huntly and Cambridge.

A range of services are available from collision repair and car painting to windscreen repair and replacement. Our qualified team will get you back on the road safely and efficiently, without any … View more
Collision Connect is redefining collision repairs. We are based in both Huntly and Cambridge.

A range of services are available from collision repair and car painting to windscreen repair and replacement. Our qualified team will get you back on the road safely and efficiently, without any mucking around.

Call us now on 0800 799 961.
Find out more

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Where would you most like to go once NZ borders open?
  • 53.4% Australia
    53.4% Complete
  • 26.2% Europe
    26.2% Complete
  • 10.5% United States
    10.5% Complete
  • 9.9% Bali
    9.9% Complete
191 votes
9 hours ago

Wood-Look Blinds: A stylishly durable and cost‑effective alternative

Ven-lu-ree Blind Services

Enjoy the look of a wooden Venetian blind with increased durability and greater cost-effectiveness.

Available in white or cream to suit your interior design, our wood‑look blinds look stylish and stunning yet are suitable to be used in wet or damp areas such as kitchens and bathrooms. The slats … View more
Enjoy the look of a wooden Venetian blind with increased durability and greater cost-effectiveness.

Available in white or cream to suit your interior design, our wood‑look blinds look stylish and stunning yet are suitable to be used in wet or damp areas such as kitchens and bathrooms. The slats are not affected by water and are very easy to clean.

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15 hours ago

We have now moved to

Dyverse Dentures

We are in now in the Mangere town centre across the Mangere Birthing center by the Mangere Saturday Market parking lot.

Call us on 09 6344543 to make you appointments or visit us at 12C Waddon Place, Mangere, Auckland 2022.

We are open right up to Christmas
Find out more

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15 hours ago

Melbourne Cup at Acacia Cove

Acacia Cove Village

Big thanks to John McGough for a wonderful afternoon of entertainment from the balcony! Staff made sure residents were at a safe distance, and staying in their bubbles.

So nice to socialise (social distancing) bubble partners permitted, after such a long lockdown, thanks to Bruce, and wonderful … View more
Big thanks to John McGough for a wonderful afternoon of entertainment from the balcony! Staff made sure residents were at a safe distance, and staying in their bubbles.

So nice to socialise (social distancing) bubble partners permitted, after such a long lockdown, thanks to Bruce, and wonderful staff we have been kept safe in the village. A great entertaining afternoon, and we dressed for the occasion!
Find out more

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2 days ago

Auckland Council supports City Mission’s Auckland Angels appeal

The Team from Auckland Council

We are throwing our support behind Auckland City Mission’s ‘Auckland Angels’ appeal, helping to ensure Aucklanders in greatest need can celebrate Christmas after a particularly tough year.

ℹ️ Click on Read More to find out more about:
🟢 How to donate
🟢 What is needed
🟢 Gift … View more
We are throwing our support behind Auckland City Mission’s ‘Auckland Angels’ appeal, helping to ensure Aucklanders in greatest need can celebrate Christmas after a particularly tough year.

ℹ️ Click on Read More to find out more about:
🟢 How to donate
🟢 What is needed
🟢 Gift ideas

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1 day ago

FATAL TRAM CRASH

Cyril Skilton from Onehunga Fencible & Historical Society Inc.

Western Leader. 16-10-1963

In 1917 a quarry was being worked where Trafalgar Street meets Queen Street, there being no roadway connecting Trafalgar Street with Cardwell Street. A bluff of solid rock was opposite the shopping area on the north side of Trafalgar Street, below which was a tram … View more
Western Leader. 16-10-1963

In 1917 a quarry was being worked where Trafalgar Street meets Queen Street, there being no roadway connecting Trafalgar Street with Cardwell Street. A bluff of solid rock was opposite the shopping area on the north side of Trafalgar Street, below which was a tram shelter.

Gas was the medium for street illumination, a lamplighter going from lamp to lamp turning on the gas as sunset approached. Earlier, he carried a ladder to get to the lamp, lit the jet, and wended his way to the next one. But, at the time of which we are writing, the incandescent mantle was used with a pilot light, and all the lighter had to do was turn on the gas with a long pole which he carried. The gas had to be turned off again in due time. Later still, the time-clocks were installed, thus automatically controlling the times for gas to be turned on or off. The lamp-lighter would use the trams to travel from lamp to lamp, when he had finished he stood his long pole upright at the rear of the tram.

A DRIVERLESS TRAM LASHES INTO SOLID ROCK.
At five o'clock on Saturday afternoon on Mat 26th, 1917, tram No. 107, fully manned with its driver and conductor, left Auckland on it regular run to the Onehunga terminus, a run that was not completed.
After picking up and setting down passengers on its Pacific Coast to the Tasman Coast run, it eventually arrived at the Selwyn stop in Trafalgar Street about 35 minutes later. Rain was falling. When the conductor gave the usual two bells to proceed, denoting all was clear as far as he was concerned, the motorman, as was customary before accelerating, leaned out from his platform to see that all was clear behind, using the control handle and a stanchion as an anchor. Unfortunately the control handle was a little loose and came away from the control post, when it was most wanted to stay put, the driver lost his balance and landed on the roadway, the driverless tram gathering speed as it went down the incline. He immediately got up to give chase, but his efforts were in vain. He knew, with the ever-increasing speed disaster was on its way, no tram could take that sharp-angled bend into Queen Street, at speed.

Meanwhile, inside the tram the scene was of ordinary homeward bound passengers reading their papers or chatting in light unconcern, unaware of the tram having no controller, the darkness and the closed door preventing them from noticing his absence; even the unusually loud rattle and noise of the racing machinery passed unnoticed until, arriving at the sharp bend into Queen Street, the runaway jumped the rails, when it was too late for them to realise their desperate situation, as the tram, now without lights, crashed into the solid rock cutting, which at this point bounded the roadway, just grazing the shelter-shed in its mad career.
The force of the collision telescoped the front platform, the body was torn off the bogies on which it rode and the whole forepart of the framework was cracked and splintered, while flying glass added to the peril of the occupants. (All control handles were fitted with a locking device after this. Ed.)
The interior of the tram immediately became a scene of pitiable confusion and suffering. Some of the passengers in the fore compartment, by the force of the impact, were thrown right over the heads of others in front of them, others were badly hurt by the grinding wood¬work, and others by flying glass. Those in the rear, naturally did not suffer such severe injuries, but all suffered from shock, whilst the horror of the situation was made worse by the cries and moans of the injured and the uncertainty in the darkness of the extent of the damage.
Although only two or three actually saw the disaster, the noise caused by the impact of travelling tons of steel and wood on to the face of solid rock was heard for some distance away, and rescuers were quickly on the scene, some sensibly bringing lamps, and lanterns. Police Sergeant Rodgers and his staff and Doctors H. Tresidder, W.G. Scott, and W. Scott-Watson quickly responded to the urgent call for help. The work of releasing the more seriously injured from the wreckage of the tram went on as expeditiously as possible although the falling rain and muddy state of the roads hampered them somewhat. First-aid was rendered to the more urgent cases before being despatched by ambulance to the hospital. The ambulance was on the scene in very smart order, about eleven minutes after the hospital had received word of the tragic accident.
Among the injured were; Fourteen year old Gladys Rhodes, fracture at base of skull, condition very serious two Gays later (Miss Rhodes is now Mrs. D. Grant of Huapai Street, and is confined to a wheelchair as a result of the tram smash); an eight year old girl who was travelling with her mother, who was killed, fracture of the thigh, abrasions on other parts of the body, was semi-conscious two days later; a twenty year old man, fractured thigh; a married woman, general bruising, face and body, sprained wrist. All were in hospital within one hour of the smash.
Thirty other passengers including an eighteen year old and a fifteen and a half year old, two other daughters of the woman who received fatal injuries, and the motorman who received minor injuries and shock, were treated on the spot before being sent home by motorcars requisitioned for this purpose.
Most of the injuries were fractures of wrist and fingers, scalp wounds, chest injuries, bruises, abrasions, and cuts on all parts of head and body, and one lost upper canine teeth.
(Mrs. Grant told the “Manukau Progress" that she was unconscious for a fortnight and was in hospital for seven weeks. A broken collarbone was discovered after she had been in hospital for some weeks. The compensation that was paid out on her behalf was two weeks salary for her father, who had visited her continuously in hospital, and compensation for her clothing which was ruined.

THE INQUEST OF THE FATAL TRAM CRASH
On May 28th, 1917, at the Onehunga Courthouse, an inquest into the death of the woman who lost her life in the FATAL TRAM CRASH was held before the District Coroner, Mr. D.A. Sutherland, and the following jury, Mr. J. Laping,(foreman) Messrs. R. Buchannan, L. Whitaker, E.V, Sutherland T.R. Partington and S. Strong. Sergeant M. Rogers represented the police. Mr. C. Schnauer appeared for the relatives of the deceased.

Evidence of identification was heard. The doctor gave evidence that the deceased died a few minutes after his arrival at a house in Tra¬falgar Street, and that to him shock was the cause of death. After the hearing of Mr. J.J. Walklate, manager of the Auckland Electric Tram¬ways Co. who expressed the company's sympathy, the inquest was adjourned.

The conductor said that he was about the middle of the car collecting fares when he gave the signal to start at Selwyn Street stop. He noticed that the brakes were not being applied at the approach to Queen Street and when the tram jumped the rails and crashed he was thrown against a window. He extricated himself and saw the motorman coming down the street with the control handle in his hand. He said, in answer to a question, that, had he known that the motorman had fallen off, he would have gone either to the front or the rear platform, and by knocking out the switch and applying the brake, stopped the car.

A tram inspector said that the motorman was a trustworthy and reliable man, and notwithstanding the accident, he considered that the precaution taken by the motorman in looking to the rear of the car before starting was for the safety of the travelling public.

A car-shed foreman said that all the controller handles were regularly examined and repaired. He removed the wrecked car and noticed that the controller was on the second notch of the power. The inquest was again adjourned.

Before proceedings commenced on the adjourned inquest, the jury and other interested parties witnessed an ocular demonstration by the motor¬man that went to clear up several points over which there was some difference of opinion, one of which was between the motorman and Mr. Schnauer of the matter of 20 feet and 50 feet at the Selwyn Street stopping place. The demonstration cleared this matter up. The evidence of the motorman was that the controller handle was quite loose and, if he had one as close-fitting as used on the demonstration, the accident may not have happened. The handle in use on the night of the accident was then used, and it fitted very much looser than the other one.

The Verdict.

After deliberating for two and a half hours, the following verdict was announced.

1. We find that tramcar No. 107, in which the deceased was a passenger on Saturday. May 26th, 1917, left the rails at the foot of Trafalgar Street, Onehunga, and dashed into an el1bankment on the east side of Queen Street.

2. What caused the tram to leave the rails at this point? Excessive speed of the car through the motorman not being in charge to control it.

3. Why was the motorman not in charge of the car at this point? Because he fell off the car at or near the Selwyn Street stopping place while looking out of the car at his left hand towards the rear and taking the control handle with him.

4. Was it part of the motorman's duty, as defined by the company's rules, to look round to the rear of the car when starting it! No. That has been the custom for the motorman to do so for some years past.

5. We find that the motorman would not have fallen off the ear, notwithstanding that he observed this custom, if the controller handle had been a sufficiently close-fitting one.

6. We find that the deceased died of shock as the result of an accident to a tramcar on Saturday evening, May 26th 1917, in which she was a passenger. We further find that the motorman accidently fell off the tram car, No. 107,

The jury added the following rider.

I. We approve of the custom of the motorman looking round the rear of the car and we recommend that as long "as this custom obtains, he shall not start the car before doing so.

2. We consider that there should be some protection, such as a chain across the motorman's entrance, to prevent him falling off the car when on duty.

3. We recommend that the advertising matter which obstructs the passengers and conductor's view of the motorman should be sufficiently removed to admit a clear view of the motorman from inside the car.

1 day ago

Volunteers needed

The Team from Red Cross Shop Onehunga

Our search is still on! 🔍
We’re on the lookout for amazing people who would be keen to lend a hand in our Red Cross Shop in Onehunga.

If you’d like to volunteer in a Red Cross Shop and you're looking for a fun team to spend a few hours with while doing good, just hit the button below … View more
Our search is still on! 🔍
We’re on the lookout for amazing people who would be keen to lend a hand in our Red Cross Shop in Onehunga.

If you’d like to volunteer in a Red Cross Shop and you're looking for a fun team to spend a few hours with while doing good, just hit the button below for more information or call us on (09) 622 1565.

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1 day ago

Cook Island Donuts

Kevin from Papatoetoe

Selling donuts this morning will be ready for pickup 6.00am call or text me 0226516062 to order.
$10.00 for 1 dozen (12)

Negotiable

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1 day ago

Have your say on your local.

The Team from Neighbourly.co.nz

Has the pandemic made you shop more locally? Do you feel like you can rely on your community?

Let us know in our State of the Neighbourhood survey and you could win 1 of 10 $100 Prezzy cards.
Take the survey

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1 day ago

PET BABY MAGPIE MISSING

Kevin from Onehunga

My girlfriend and I have lost our rescue pet MAGPIE at One tree Hil area and we are desperate to have him back home as the magpie is too young to self feed or fly properly . We are offering a cash REWARD for anyone that can find him. Ring us anytime if you find out baby . Ph 0223291809

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3 days ago

Face Mask - Hairdresser

Carissa from Papatoetoe

Here's a tip to keep you and your hairdresser safe when you get your much awaited hairdo. I did this last year and it works a treat. Cut off the ear loops from your surgical mask, stick fashion tape (buy from Spotlight or haberdashery stores) along the two outer edges of your mask and stick it… View moreHere's a tip to keep you and your hairdresser safe when you get your much awaited hairdo. I did this last year and it works a treat. Cut off the ear loops from your surgical mask, stick fashion tape (buy from Spotlight or haberdashery stores) along the two outer edges of your mask and stick it to your cheeks so the ear loops aren't in the way of scissors, hair colour and washing. Double sided tape may work, but might not stick long enough. Not a time to be complacent folks. Let's all protect eachother.

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2 days ago

What should we learn from 107 days of Covid-19 lockdown?

Todd Niall Reporter from Community News

Kia ora neighbours, Who isn't keen to put 107 days of Covid-19 Alert Level 3 and 4 behind us? But there are some important lessons to remember as we move on. Read the story below?

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3 days ago

PLANTAIN BANANA PLANTS

Praveen from Papatoetoe

PLANTAIN BANANA PLANTS!
VERY SWEET WHEN RIPE
$20 EACH
NO TIME WASTERS

2 days ago

BLACK FRIDAY!!!

Ameliah Sandys from Red Cross Shop Onehunga

Black Friday is here and we have some good specials for you. Something different everyday until the 3rd of December. So pop in everyday to grab a bargain that you don’t want to miss out on.

Today our books are up for grabs, from novels, cook books to kids books. Yes! Anything that looks like a … View more
Black Friday is here and we have some good specials for you. Something different everyday until the 3rd of December. So pop in everyday to grab a bargain that you don’t want to miss out on.

Today our books are up for grabs, from novels, cook books to kids books. Yes! Anything that looks like a book it’s on special for you today.

We also have a “make an offer” table from brick brac, furniture, reading glasses, cups/mugs to toys and many more. Come on in and grab a bargain today.

Be safe & be kind.

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4 days ago

Can someone explain this to me

Derek from Papatoetoe

A parcel was posted to me in Papatoetoe from Melbourne on Friday 19 November I recovered it today 5 days later. I m happy
A parcel posted from Botany to Papatoetoe was collected Mon the 11 November and I’m still waiting for this.
How does a parcel from Australia arrive quicker than something … View more
A parcel was posted to me in Papatoetoe from Melbourne on Friday 19 November I recovered it today 5 days later. I m happy
A parcel posted from Botany to Papatoetoe was collected Mon the 11 November and I’m still waiting for this.
How does a parcel from Australia arrive quicker than something about 9kms away?
Buy NZ made keep your country working
Na I rather buy from Australia get it quicker
Both from courier post

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