33 days ago

Alice, Ashton Warner Academy case study baby

Amanda Shribman, Principal from Ashton Warner Academy

Our case study baby meets students regularly so they can chart her development from birth.
We are having fun and learning at the Academy right now, and looking forward to meeting our new students in 2022.

83 days ago

Not everyone knows the secret of what a trained nanny does...

Amanda Shribman, Principal from Ashton Warner Academy

The job of a professional nanny varies a lot depending on the needs of each particular family but usually involves most or all of the following:
• feed, wash and dress children
• plan and supervise the children's daily activities

• play and do learning activities with children

• … View more
The job of a professional nanny varies a lot depending on the needs of each particular family but usually involves most or all of the following:
• feed, wash and dress children
• plan and supervise the children's daily activities

• play and do learning activities with children

• behaviour guidance

• infant care

• give advice and support to new mothers

• care for sick children in the home

• keep records of children's learning and development etc

• do everyday household tasks for the children such as cleaning and laundry

• plan and prepare meals for children and sometimes for family members

• drive children to and from early childhood services, school or other activities

• supervise and help school-aged children with homework

• do grocery shopping for the family


Just as families have different needs, there are lots of different types of nanny jobs:

• a live-in nanny lives in the family home, often in a separate apartment there, or with their own room. A live-out nanny lives at her own place and goes to work with the family each day.

• a 'manny' or male nanny is often employed by well-off solo mothers who work at their careers full time and have boys. This is to give the boys a male role model and also to get them involved in outdoor sports and adventures.

• a nanny-share involves working for two families usually in one or other of their family homes. Because they share the costs it’s more affordable.

• a night nanny looks after the needs of an infant overnight to let their parents sleep (nappy changes, feeds etc)

• maternity nannies have extra training or experience in helping and supporting mothers with the care of new-borns and are very well paid

• Note: au pairs are different from professional nannies. They are usually an international traveller who often has little or no experience working with children. An au pair assists with a few household tasks plays with the children and receives room, board, and some pocket money in return.



Employer demand for nannies and rates of pay:

Pay for nannies varies depending on their qualifications experience and location.

Qualified nannies with more than one years' experience can earn around $28 an hour. Nannies who look after newborn babies earn up to $32 an hour. Professional nannies are in big demand in New Zealand with big money being paid for very exciting jobs. There is also a shortage of nannies in Australia and in London with pay around $30 to $35 an hour.


Did Mary Poppins need a qualification?

Mary Poppins didn’t need a qualification because in the past childcare was often provided by unqualified people. This would often just involve feeding the kids, changing their nappies and plonking them in front of a TV. These days professional nannies and home-based carers also educate and provide lots of exciting learning activities for the children following a programme set down by the Ministry of Education. This means they need formal training as well as to understand patterns of child development and education. They need a qualification in early childhood education and care.

173 days ago

Welcoming New Students! ~ Free help for local families

Amanda Shribman, Principal from Ashton Warner Academy

Welcome to our new intake of students who started with us in Stanmore Bay on Monday - still room for a couple more if you'd like to join us.
Would you like an early childhood/nanny student to give free help with your children? Check our website for details nannyacademy.ac.nz...

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202 days ago

Cake decorating

Amanda Shribman, Principal from Ashton Warner Academy

Intake one are learning to set up the ultimate children's party.
Our second intake starts 14 June. A great preparation for a fun career with children - call us now for a free info pack 0210409311

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217 days ago

Families urgently needed to get free help with their infants and children - Apply Now!

Amanda Shribman, Principal from Ashton Warner Academy

Would you like to get free help with your children by offering work experience to our students who are training to be early childhood educators and professional nannies?

We are looking for families on the Hibiscus Coast and nearby who are interested and have two or more infants and children home … View more
Would you like to get free help with your children by offering work experience to our students who are training to be early childhood educators and professional nannies?

We are looking for families on the Hibiscus Coast and nearby who are interested and have two or more infants and children home with them most of the working week. Contact us now. For details visit: nannyacademy.ac.nz/studentplacement

245 days ago

Government rules mean Early Childhood educators, home-based carers and nannies need to be qualified.

Amanda Shribman, Principal from Ashton Warner Academy

We have one last intake to our level 3 certificate which will meet this requirement. Text me now to find out how you can get the qualification you need. 021 040 9311

252 days ago

Turn your spare room into cash

Amanda Shribman, Principal from Ashton Warner Academy

We have lovely students from all over NZ now looking for families to board with in Stanmore Bay and the Hibiscus Coast.
Not only a great way to turn a spare room into weekly cash, it can be useful if you want to employ a baby-sitter! Please contact us if you are interested. Text 0210409311 or … View more
We have lovely students from all over NZ now looking for families to board with in Stanmore Bay and the Hibiscus Coast.
Not only a great way to turn a spare room into weekly cash, it can be useful if you want to employ a baby-sitter! Please contact us if you are interested. Text 0210409311 or for details and application.. nannyacademy.ac.nz...

271 days ago

Thinking of a career with children? Here is what you need to know.

Amanda Shribman, Principal from Ashton Warner Academy

By Amanda Shribman – Amanda has a post-graduate diploma in careers guidance and is Principal of the Ashton Warner Academy in Stanmore Bay. She is happy to give free advice if you contact her.

#1 GETTING A QUALIFICATION IS VITAL
While school teachers have needed a university degree for years, the… View more
By Amanda Shribman – Amanda has a post-graduate diploma in careers guidance and is Principal of the Ashton Warner Academy in Stanmore Bay. She is happy to give free advice if you contact her.

#1 GETTING A QUALIFICATION IS VITAL
While school teachers have needed a university degree for years, the care and education of children aged less than five was often provided by people with few or no qualifications, and care was often limited to feeding the kids, changing their nappies, and just plonking them in front of the TV. Times have changed! Early childhood centres, home-based caregivers and professional nannies are now required to educate children following a programme set down by the Ministry of Education. To do this, they need to be qualified and to understand patterns of child development and education.

#2 THERE ARE THREE MAIN WAYS TO GET THE QUALIFICATION YOU NEED

Option One: A three-year full time degree course:
This is a good choice if you have gained University Entrance and enjoy academic study and essay writing. Classes are often big; you meet lots of people and get to enjoy the stimulating experience of university student life. After three years you've got a qualification that will last a lifetime. Part time study is offered by many providers, but of course it will take longer than three years for you to complete the degree!

Option Two: A one-year full time course:
If you are not keen to commit to a long period of unpaid training the NZ Diploma in Early Childhood Education (L5) offered by several institutions around the country (including the Ashton Warner Academy in Stanmore Bay). You complete your qualification in just one year, which means that for most students your fees will be paid by the government and you won’t have to have a student loan.

The course often has more practical hands-on learning than a degree course. You learn about child development theory and practice but there are no big final exams. Classes are often smaller, giving you more contact and support from your tutor. You usually need to have completed Year 12 and have had some experience with children (e.g. babysitting).

The Diploma qualifies you to start work as an educator at an early childhood centre or work providing home-based care as a professional nanny. The qualification also gives you as much as full credit towards first year of a degree at some educational providers if you want to carry on towards a degree.

Option 3: A half-year entry-level course like the NZ Certificate in Early Childhood Education and Care (L3)
The Certificate can lead to employment as a teaching assistant in an early childhood centre or as a mother's help. The half-year programme is a good starting point if you have found schoolwork difficult or are not confident about going back into education. It's also a great preparation for higher-level qualifications.

WHATEVER PROVIDER OR COURSE YOU CHOOSE HERE ARE SOME GOOD QUESTIONS TO ASK:

• How many people get jobs with children after they graduate?
• How many people leave without finishing your course?
• How much practical experience with children will l get?
• What are the class sizes?

It's also a really good idea to talk with employers like early childhood centres, nanny agencies, and home-based care providers to see what courses and providers they recommend.

Most providers have a mid-year intake of students, but courses often fill fast to it would be good to make plans soon. PS The second intake at the Academy is starting in mid-June.

If you would like to ask for more advice about your options or would like an information pack about courses at the Ashton Warner Academy …. nannyacademy.ac.nz or text 0210409311

281 days ago

Surviving Lockdown with Small Children (and a solitary cat)

Amanda Shribman, Principal from Ashton Warner Academy

It's lockdown AGAIN and many of us have exhausted all our ideas for keeping the children happy and occupied at home. Maybe some of these may help?

One of my earliest memories is as a toddler hiding in a large cardboard box to leap out and scare Dad when he arrived home from work. Perhaps … View more
It's lockdown AGAIN and many of us have exhausted all our ideas for keeping the children happy and occupied at home. Maybe some of these may help?

One of my earliest memories is as a toddler hiding in a large cardboard box to leap out and scare Dad when he arrived home from work. Perhaps because of this, large cardboard boxes, the sort that TVs, microwaves and fridges come in, have always been a favourite with small children.

Boxes can be cut and arranged to make sit-in cars, trucks, trains or a wonderful playhouse with opening doors and windows. They can be painted inside and out. Glue and sparkle dust can make a magical transformation. Cushions make cosy furniture for a secret fort and a great place to have lunch.

Here are some other ideas from the Ashton Warner staff that may help save your sanity and help the children's development. Try a bubble bath with food colouring and lots of plastic containers for pouring. Make popcorn and tickets and set up an indoor 'movie' afternoon with a video. Give the children the run of your wardrobe and let them dress up in your clothes (if you dare). Try getting children involved in baking bread using yeast – children love the magic of seeing the dough rise when left in a warm place. Make secret passages and hide-outs under chairs and tables using sheets and tablecloths- a great place to read scary stories.

Zoe was a particularly solitary and elusive tabby cat who used to hide in many odd and unusual places around our house. One wet day at home the children occupied themselves happily for hours in a hugely successful 'animal hunt', before Zoe was finally discovered and her trauma overcome by many treats and cuddles.

Poor old Zoe, these days we have modified the game to avoid animal suffering. 'Hunt Dad' is just as much fun and is far kinder. After all, many Dads are solitary and elusive just like Zoe, but the advantage is that most Dads have been well traumatised already!

Please do let us know if there are any particular parenting issues that you would us to discuss in future on neighbourly.

299 days ago

Half-year Early Childhood course. Credits to NCEA

Amanda Shribman, Principal from Ashton Warner Academy

Did you know that as well as our Diploma Course we also offer the NZ Certificate in Early Childhood and Care (L3)?
You don't need a qualification to get in, it's a fun course, free for school-leavers and takes about 6 months.
A great start if you want to work with children and you gain … View more
Did you know that as well as our Diploma Course we also offer the NZ Certificate in Early Childhood and Care (L3)?
You don't need a qualification to get in, it's a fun course, free for school-leavers and takes about 6 months.
A great start if you want to work with children and you gain credits towards NCEA.
The course starts February 22nd. Please contact Amanda at the Ashton Warner Academy in Stanmore Bay now for more information 021 040 9311

329 days ago

Three important things to know when planning a career with children

Amanda Shribman, Principal from Ashton Warner Academy

By Amanda Shribman – Amanda has a post-graduate diploma in careers guidance and is Principal of the Ashton Warner Academy in Stanmore Bay. She is happy to give you free advice if you wish to contact her.

Three things to know when planning a career with young children...

#1 GETTING A … View more
By Amanda Shribman – Amanda has a post-graduate diploma in careers guidance and is Principal of the Ashton Warner Academy in Stanmore Bay. She is happy to give you free advice if you wish to contact her.

Three things to know when planning a career with young children...

#1 GETTING A QUALIFICATION IS VITAL

While school teachers have needed a university degree for years, the care and education of children aged less than five was often provided by people with few or no qualifications, and care was often limited to feeding the kids, changing their nappies, and just plonking them in front of the TV. Times have changed! Early childhood centres, home-based caregivers and professional nannies are now required to educate children following a programme set down by the Ministry of Education. To do this, they need to be qualified and to understand patterns of child development and education.

#2 THERE ARE THREE MAIN WAYS TO GET THE QUALIFICATION YOU NEED

Option One: A three-year full time degree course:

This is a good choice if you have gained University Entrance and enjoy academic study and essay writing. Classes are often big; you meet lots of people and get to enjoy the stimulating experience of university student life. After three years you've got a qualification that will last a lifetime. Part time study is offered by many providers, but of course it will take longer than three years for you to complete the degree!

Option 2: A one-year full time course; For example, the NZ Diploma in Early Childhood Education (L5) offered by several institutions around the country (including the Ashton Warner Academy in Stanmore Bay).

You complete your qualification in just one year, which means that for most students your fees will be paid by the government and you won’t have to have a student loan. The course often has more practical hands-on learning than a degree course. You learn about child development theory and practice but there are no big final exams. Classes are often smaller, giving you more contact and support from your tutor. You usually need to have completed Year 12 and have had some experience with children (e.g. babysitting).

The Diploma qualifies you to start work as an educator at an early childhood centre or work providing home-based care as a professional nanny. The qualification also gives you as much as full credit towards first year of a degree at some educational providers if you want to carry on towards a degree.

Option 3: A half-year entry-level course like the NZ Certificate in Early Childhood Education and Care (L3)

The Certificate can lead to employment as a teaching assistant in an early childhood centre or as a mother's help. The half-year programme is a good starting point if you have found schoolwork difficult or are not confident about going back into education. It's also a great preparation for higher-level qualifications.

#3 WHATEVER PROVIDER OR COURSE YOU CHOOSE HERE ARE SOME GOOD QUESTIONS TO ASK:

• How many people get jobs with children after they graduate?
• How many people leave without finishing your course?
• How much practical experience with children will l get?
• What are the class sizes?

Finally, it is a really good idea to talk with employers like early childhood centres, nanny agencies, and home-based care providers to see what courses and providers they recommend.

If you would like to ask for more advice about your options or would like an information pack about courses at the Ashton Warner Academy …. nannyacademy.ac.nz or text 0210409311

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